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Antioxidant potential

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Antioxidant potential definition

Compounds that inhibit oxidative stress on body cells cause by free radicals, and may also reduce inflammation.


Medical conditions that can affect Antioxidant potential

Burns
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
DNA Damage
Edema
Erythema
Inflammation
Oxidative Damage

What supplements help with Antioxidant potential?

  • Black Turmeric for Antioxidant potential

  • Blueberry for Antioxidant potential

test
Moderately Positive


A 2 (treatment) × 3 (time) repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Increases in F₂-isoprostanes and 5-OHMU were significantly less in BB and plasma IL-10 and NK cell counts were significantly greater in BB vs. CON. Changes in all other markers did not differ. This study indicates that daily blueberry consumption for 6 weeks increases NK cell counts, and acute ingestion reduces oxidative stress and increases anti-inflammatory cytokines.


test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, one portion of blueberries seems sufficient to improve cell antioxidant defense against DNA damage, but further studies are necessary to understand their role on vascular function.


test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, the consumption of the WB drink for 6 weeks significantly reduced the levels of oxidized DNA bases and increased the resistance to oxidatively induced DNA damage. Future studies should address in greater detail the role of WB in endothelial function.


test
Moderately Positive


Variants for COMT tended to benefit less or even experienced detrimental effects from intervention. With respect to GSTT1, the effect is ambiguous; variants respond better in terms of intervention-related increase in TEAC, but wild-types benefit more from its protecting effects against oxidative DNA damage. We conclude that genotyping for relevant polymorphisms enables selecting subgroups among the general population that benefit more of DNA damage-modulating effects of micronutrients.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, the consumption of wild blueberries, a food source with high in vitro antioxidant properties, is associated with a diet-induced increase in ex vivo serum antioxidant status. It has been suggested that increasing the antioxidant status of serum may result in the reduced risk of many chronic degenerative diseases.


test
Slightly Positive


In summary, a practically consumable quantity of blueberries (75 g) can provide statistically significant oxidative protection in vivo after a high-carbohydrate, low-fat breakfast. Though not tested directly, it is likely that the effects are due to phenolic compounds, either directly or indirectly, as they are a major family of compounds in blueberries with potential bioactive activity.


test
Slightly Positive


The decreases in plasma oxidized LDL and serum malondialdehyde and hydroxynonenal concentrations were greater in the blueberry group (- 28 and - 17%, respectively) than in the control group (- 9 and - 9%) (P lt 0.01). Our study shows blueberries may improve selected features of metabolic syndrome and related cardiovascular risk factors at dietary achievable doses.


test
Slightly Positive


This study demonstrates that the ingestion of a blueberry smoothie prior to and after EIMD accelerates recovery of muscle peak isometric strength. This effect, although independent of the beverage's inherent antioxidant capacity, appears to involve an up-regulation of adaptive processes, i.e. endogenous antioxidant processes, activated by the combined actions of the eccentric exercise and blueberry consumption. These findings may benefit the sporting community who should consider dietary interventions that specifically target health and performance adaptation.


  • Chokeberry for Antioxidant potential

  • Cocoa Extract for Antioxidant potential

test
Moderately Positive


Evaluation of the skin surface showed a significant decrease of skin roughness and scaling in the high flavanol cocoa group compared with those at wk 12. Dietary flavanols from cocoa contribute to endogenous photoprotection, improve dermal blood circulation, and affect cosmetically relevant skin surface and hydration variables.


test
Moderately Positive


In moderately photo-aged women, regular cocoa flavanol consumption had positive effects on facial wrinkles and elasticity. Cocoa flavanol supplementation may contribute to the prevention of the progression of photo-aging. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02060097.


test
Moderately Positive


Our study failed to demonstrate a statistically-significant protective effect of HFC vs. LFC consumption on skin sensitivity to UV radiation as measured by MED.


test
Slightly Positive


Cocoa powder and dark chocolate may favorably affect cardiovascular disease risk status by modestly reducing LDL oxidation susceptibility, increasing serum total antioxidant capacity and HDL-cholesterol concentrations, and not adversely affecting prostaglandins.


test
Slightly Positive


Dark chocolate inhibits platelet function by lowering oxidative stress only in smokers; this effect seems to be dependent on its polyphenolic content.


test
Slightly Positive


Epi-rich cocoa treatment improves SkM mitochondrial structure and in an orchestrated manner, increases molecular markers of mitochondrial biogenesis resulting in enhanced cristae density. Future controlled studies are warranted using Epi-rich cocoa (or pure Epi) to translate improved mitochondrial structure into enhanced cardiac and/or SkM muscle function.


test
Slightly Positive


Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate improves endothelial function and is associated with an increase in plasma epicatechin concentrations in healthy adults. No changes in oxidative stress measures, lipid profiles, blood pressure, body weight or BMI were seen.


test
Slightly Positive


Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate intake significantly improved coronary circulation in healthy adults, independent of changes in oxidative stress parameters, blood pressure and lipid profile, whereas non-flavonoid white chocolate had no such effects.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, FCMC consumption was associated with changes in several variables often associated with cardiovascular health and oxidant stress. The presence of significant quantities of flavanols in FCMC is likely to have been one of the contributing factors to these results.


test
Slightly Positive


Our study shows for the first time that consumption of dark chocolate acutely decreases wave reflections, that it does not affect aortic stiffness, and that it may exert a beneficial effect on endothelial function in healthy adults. Chocolate consumption may exert a protective effect on the cardiovascular system; further studies are warranted to assess any long-term effects.


test
Slightly Positive


The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3'-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 microM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05).


test
Slightly Negative


In PAD patients dark but not milk chocolate acutely improves walking autonomy with a mechanism possibly related to an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism involving NOX2 regulation.


  • Coenzyme Q10 for Antioxidant potential

test
Moderately Positive


Although there is an increased demand for plasma CoQ10 during endurance exercise and CoQ10 supplement can depress lipid peroxidation, there is no effect of CoQ10 supplementation on liver mitochondrial function and aerobic capacity in adolescent athletes.


test
Moderately Positive


In patients with ischaemic LVSD, 8 weeks supplement of CoQ improved mitochondrial function and FMD; and the improvement of FMD correlated with the change in mitochondrial function, suggesting that CoQ improved endothelial function via reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with ischaemic LVSD.


test
Moderately Positive


Our results provide further evidence suggesting that CoQ10 supplementation is associated with alleviating oxidative stress, although it does not show any significant effects on sperm concentration, motility and morphology. It may be suggested that CoQ10 could be taken as an adjunct therapy in cases of OAT. Further studies are needed to draw a final conclusion.


test
Moderately Positive


The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM.


test
Slightly Positive


Coenzyme Q(10) supplementation improves endothelial function of conduit arteries of the peripheral circulation in dyslipidaemic patients with Type II diabetes. The mechanism could involve increased endothelial release and/or activity of nitric oxide due to improvement in vascular oxidative stress, an effect that might not be reflected by changes in plasma F(2)-isoprostane concentrations.


test
Slightly Positive


Coenzyme Q10 supplements at a dose of 150 mg can decrease oxidative stress and increase antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with CAD. A higher dose of coenzyme Q10 supplements (>150 mg/d) might promote rapid and sustainable antioxidation in patients with CAD.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, Med diet reduces postprandial oxidative stress by reducing processes of cellular oxidation and increases the action of the antioxidant system in elderly persons and the administration of CoQ further improves this redox balance.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, we found no evidence that coenzyme Q(10) affects fatigue index, arterial stiffness, metabolic parameters, or inflammatory markers.


  • Curcumin for Antioxidant potential

test
Moderately Positive


Collectively, these results demonstrate that a low dose of a curcumin-lipid preparation can produce a variety of potentially health promoting effects in healthy middle aged people.


test
Moderately Positive


Curcumin seems to be a promising and safe medication for maintaining remission in patients with quiescent UC. Further studies on curcumin should strengthen our findings.


test
Moderately Positive


Curcuminoids at doses of 6000 mg/d in 3 divided doses are well tolerated and may prove efficacious in controlling signs and symptoms of oral lichen planus.


test
Moderately Positive


Curcuminoids may be used to ameliorate oxidative damage in patients with beta-thalassemia/Hb E disease.


test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, short-term curcumin intervention ablates DKD progress with activating Nrf2 anti-oxidative system and anti-inflammatory efficacies in patients with T2DM.


test
Moderately Positive


Oral curcumin with piperine reversed lipid peroxidation in patients with tropical pancreatitis. Further studies with large sample are needed to define its effect on the pain and other manifestations of tropical pancreatitis.


test
Moderately Positive


Short-term supplementation with curcuminoid-piperine combination significantly improves oxidative and inflammatory status in patients with MetS. Curcuminoids could be regarded as natural, safe and effective CRP-lowering agents.


test
Moderately Positive


Short-term turmeric supplementation can attenuate proteinuria, TGF-β and IL-8 in patients with overt type 2 diabetic nephropathy and can be administered as a safe adjuvant therapy for these patients.


test
Moderately Positive


Short-term turmeric supplementation can decrease proteinuria, hematuria, and systolic blood pressure in patients suffering from relapsing or refractory lupus nephritis and can be used as an adjuvant safe therapy for such patients.


test
Moderately Positive


The blood samples of the endemic regions showed severe DNA damage with increased levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation. The antioxidants were found with depleted activity. Three months curcumin intervention reduced the DNA damage, retarded ROS generation and lipid peroxidation and raised the level of antioxidant activity. Thus curcumin may have some protective role against the DNA damage caused by arsenic.


test
Moderately Positive


The results indicate that this novel curcumin in a turmeric matrix acts as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent for the management of RA at a dose as low as 250 mg twice daily as evidenced by significant improvement in the ESR, CRP, VAS, RF, DAS28, and ACR responses compared to placebo. Both doses of the study product were well tolerated and without side effects.


test
Moderately Positive


This represents the most ambitious attempt, to date, to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of curcumin as an anti-inflammatory agent. Significant improvements of both the clinical and biochemical end points were observed for Meriva compared to the control group. This, coupled with an excellent tolerability, suggests that Meriva is worth considering for the long-term complementary management of osteoarthritis.


test
Moderately Positive


Turmeric supplementation as an adjuvant to T2DM on metformin treatment had a beneficial effect on blood glucose, oxidative stress and inflammation.


test
Slightly Positive


It is therefore suggested that curcumin supplement would not be appropriate for healthy people except for reducing serum cholesterol or triglyceride levels. The dosage of a daily curcumin supplement at 500 mg is more effective than 6 g, although vitamin E is also considered to be an effective antioxidant supplement.


test
Slightly Positive


Meriva was, in general, well tolerated, and these preliminary findings suggest the usefulness of this curcumin formulation for the management of diabetic microangiopathy, opening a window of opportunities to be evaluated in more prolonged and larger studies. The molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of curcumin on microcirculation and edema are also worth investigation.


test
Slightly Positive


No significant changes were observed in other parameters between the two groups after intervention (p value < 0.05). Turmeric improved some fractions of lipid profile and decreased body weight in hyperlipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes. It had no significant effect on glycemic status, hs-CRP, and total antioxidant capacity in these patients.


test
Slightly Positive


Our data provide evidence for an enhanced bioavailable curcumin to improve homocysteine and high-density lipoprotein concentrations, which may promote favorable cardiovascular health in young, obese men. Improvements in endothelial function or blood pressure were not observed with curcumin supplementation, thus further investigation is warranted.


test
Slightly Positive


Results of the present trial suggest that curcumin supplementation reduces serum lipids and uric acid concentrations in patients with NAFLD.


test
Slightly Positive


These data indicate that 4-week supplementation with RP or TM at culinary levels does not alter oxidative stress or inflammation in overweight/obese females with systemic inflammation, or cause a significant shift in the global metabolic profile.


test
Slightly Positive


These results are associated with reduced levels of homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, triglyceride, uric acid, visceral fat and total body fat. In summary, a 6-month curcumin intervention in type 2 diabetic population lowered the atherogenic risks. In addition, the extract helped to improve relevant metabolic profiles in this high-risk population.


test
Slightly Positive



  • Feverfew for Antioxidant potential

  • Japanese Knotweed for Antioxidant potential

  • N-Acetylcysteine for Antioxidant potential

  • Olive leaf extract for Antioxidant potential

  • Spirulina for Antioxidant potential

  • Alpha-Lipoic Acid for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


Administration of irbesartan and/or lipoic acid to patients with the metabolic syndrome improves endothelial function and reduces proinflammatory markers, factors that are implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.


test
Slightly Positive


ALA supplementation significantly reduced hsCRP levels, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in HD patients.


test
Slightly Positive


ALA treatment protected AA individuals from oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. In SCD subjects, the dose applied was not effective to prevent the oxidative damage.


test
Slightly Positive


Dietary supplementation of antioxidants at 900 mg/day for 4 weeks did not change the blood biomarkers of inflammation and disease severity of RA patients under conventional medical treatments. Further considerations for dose-response relationships, duration of supplementation, and susceptible biomarkers are required.


test
Slightly Positive


However, when α-lipoic acid is combined with exercise, this atherogenic effect is abolished.


test
Slightly Positive


It is concluded that alpha-lipoic acid supplementation diminishes oxidative damage. It does not abolish differences in glutathione antioxidant system between untrained and trained subjects but modulates a pro-antioxidant response to the muscle-damaging exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


Our data showed that sHT patients exists impaired endothelial function, and antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid can improve endothelial function, through decrease of oxygen- derived free radicals.


test
Slightly Positive


Supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid may positively impact patients with HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome by restoring blood total glutathione level and improving functional reactivity of lymphocytes to T-cell mitogens.


test
Slightly Positive


Thus the data show that supportive therapy with PL along with the antioxidants hydrosoluble CoQ10, alpha-lipoic acid and vitamin E is an effective way of controlling the complications of type 2 diabetes (Tab. 7, Fig. 2, Ref. 44).


  • Arginine for Antioxidant potential

  • Boron for Antioxidant potential

  • Bromelain for Antioxidant potential

  • Chlorella for Antioxidant potential

  • Cissus quadrangularis for Antioxidant potential

  • Coffee for Antioxidant potential

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Antioxidant potential

  • Creatine for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


8 weeks of CrM supplementation had no negative effects on blood and urinary clinical health markers in football players. Properties of CrM may, however, be associated with an increase in CK activity, improving the efficiency for ATP resynthesis, a phenomenon indirectly confirmed by the decreasing tendency in uric acid concentration. Furthermore, CrM seems to slightly influence glucoregulation in trained subjects.


test
Slightly Positive


Before the supplementation period, a significant increase in the urinary 8-OHdG excretion and plasma MDA levels was observed after RE. The Cr supplementation induces a significant increase in athletics performance, and it attenuated the changes observed in the urinary 8-OHdG excretion and plasma MDA. These results indicate that Cr supplementation reduced oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation induced by a single bout of RE.


test
Slightly Positive


Cr supplementation inhibited the increase of inflammation markers TNF-α and CRP, but not oxidative stress markers, due to acute exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


Four months of CrM supplementation led to increases in FFM and handgrip strength in the dominant hand and a reduction in a marker of bone breakdown and was well tolerated in children with DD.


test
Slightly Positive


Heart rate and oxygen uptake responses to exercise were not affected by supplementation. These findings suggest that short-term creatine supplementation does not enhance non-enzymatic antioxidant defence or protect against lipid peroxidation induced by exhaustive cycling in healthy males.


test
Slightly Negative


CMH supplementation increases global DNA methylation statistically significantly. Scores were lower for creatine than for placebo reflecting clinical improvement but not reaching statistical significance. Biochemical variables of methionine-homocysteine remethylation are unaffected. Multicenter studies are urgently warranted to evaluate the long-term effects of CMH supplementation in an optimally homogenous RTT population over a prolonged period.


  • Eleuthero for Antioxidant potential

  • False Daisy for Antioxidant potential

  • Fish Oil for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


A moderate dose of n-3 PUFAs for 2 mo reduced adiposity and atherogenic markers without deterioration of insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Some adipose tissue inflammation-related genes were also reduced. These beneficial effects could be linked to morphologic and inflammatory changes in adipose tissue. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT0037.


test
Slightly Positive


Concerning oxidative status, plasma reactive oxygen species levels increased in the placebo group v. the n-3 group at the later treatment times. Hydroxynonenal levels increased in the placebo group during the study, while they stabilised in the n-3 group. Our data confirm that the continual assumption of EPA plus DHA determined an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative action which could be considered a preliminary goal in anti-cachectic therapy.


test
Slightly Positive


Daily supplementation with n-3 capsules increases the serum n-3 PUFA concentration, improves vascular function, and lowers the degree of inflammation in obese adolescents.


test
Slightly Positive


Dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA significantly improved endothelial function and reduced pro-inflammatory markers in OPDs. Thus, fish oil consumption may have beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic health effects in otherwise healthy subjects predisposed to diabetes and its vascular complications.


test
Slightly Positive


EPA concentrations in the total RBC phospholipid fraction significantly increased by 79% in the EPA group at the end of the study, and they changed very little in the control group (+0.68%). The inflammatory markers did not change in either group. It is likely that fish oil does not change hs-CRP or sTNF-Rs 1 or 2 in subjects without active inflammation.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, supplementation with n3PUFA and all-rac AT at these doses is not anti-inflammatory.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, this 12-week randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial did not show that 1.5 g/day n-3 PUFA significantly affected the serum inflammatory response in healthy individuals, nor did patterns of inflammatory markers. Thus, a healthy middle-aged population may not benefit from fish oil as an anti-inflammatory agent.


test
Slightly Positive


Oral n-3 PUFAs appear to abrogate photoimmunosuppression in human skin, providing additional support for their chemopreventive role; verification of study findings is required. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01032343.


test
Slightly Positive


Reduction in this range of early markers, i.e. sunburn, UVR-induced p53 in skin and strand breaks in PBL, indicate protection by dietary EPA against acute UVR-induced genotoxicity; longer-term supplementation might reduce skin cancer in humans.


test
Slightly Positive


Supplementation with Omega-3 fatty acids had no affect on platelet and endothelial activation or markers of inflammation in patients with peripheral arterial disease.


test
Slightly Positive


The higher dose (3.4 g/d) of EPA+DHA significantly lowered triglycerides, but neither dose improved endothelial function or inflammatory status over 8 wk in healthy adults with moderate hypertriglyceridemia. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00504309.


test
Slightly Positive


The postprandial TG increase does not stimulate monocytes beyond their circadian activation patterns. n3-FA reduce fasting TG and the postprandial TG increase. n3-FA may therefore allow to prospectively study whether selected patients benefit from TG-lowering independent of LDL- and HDL-cholesterol.


test
Slightly Positive


The results of the present study indicate that marine omega-3 fatty acids can reduce serum sICAM-1, a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but it has no effect on serum systemic inflammation markers and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients.


test
Slightly Positive


The results of this study are in agreement with some previous studies that suggest that FO supplementation has no effect on plasma proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-6, but does have an effect on IL-1β in nondialysis CKD patients.


test
Slightly Positive


The stronger association between changes in DHA than EPA and sICAM-1 concentrations suggest that DHA may be more anti-inflammatory than EPA. Thus, one reason why only limited effects were seen here may be that the dose of DHA provided was insufficient.


test
Slightly Positive


There was no effect of 12 weeks of treatment with moderate-dose fish oil supplements on cardiovascular biomarkers or mood in patients with ischemic stroke. It is possible that insufficient dose, short duration of treatment, and/or oxidation of the fish oils may have influenced these outcomes.


test
Slightly Positive


These data suggest that n-3 supplementation can reduce inflammation and anxiety even among healthy young adults. The reduction in anxiety symptoms associated with n-3 supplementation provides the first evidence that n-3 may have potential anxiolytic benefits for individuals without an anxiety disorder diagnosis. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00519779.


test
Slightly Positive


These parameters remained unchanged in the subjects fed the control diet. B-cell functions as reported here and T-cell functions that we reported previously were not altered by DHA feeding. Our results show that inhibitory effects of DHA on immune cell functions varied with the cell type, and that the inhibitory effects are not mediated through increased production of PGE2 and LTB4.


test
Slightly Positive


These results suggest that dietary fish oil may decrease the risk for cardiovascular disease through the modulation of both plasma lipids and inflammatory markers in healthy postmenopausal women.


test
Slightly Positive


Thus, omega-3 fatty acids may act as an oxidizable buffer, protecting more vital structures from free radical damage.


test
Slightly Negative


The authors observed a significantly greater NO and oxidative-stress increase with exercise (MDA, Rmax, CDmax, and NO) in the n-3 LCPUFA group than with placebo. No main or interaction effects were found for retinol and α-tocopherol. These results indicate that supplementation with n-3 LCPUFAs significantly increased oxidative stress at rest and after a judo-training session.


test
Slightly Negative


The consumption of n-3 LC-PUFA-supplemented dairy products decreases cardiovascular risk factors.


  • Garlic for Antioxidant potential

  • Ginger for Antioxidant potential

  • Ginkgo biloba for Antioxidant potential

  • Ginseng for Antioxidant potential

  • Gotu kola for Antioxidant potential

  • Grape Seed Extract for Antioxidant potential

  • Green Tea Extract for Antioxidant potential

  • Inositol for Antioxidant potential

  • Korean Black Raspberry for Antioxidant potential

  • L-Carnitine for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


Data suggest that a 2-month L-carnitine supplementation may be effective in attenuating oxidative stress responses, enhancing antioxidant status, and improving performance of patients with end-stage renal disease.


test
Slightly Positive


Exercise-induced increases in plasma malondialdehyde returned to resting values sooner during LCLT compared with placebo. The amount of muscle disruption from MRI scans during LCLT was 41-45% of the placebo area. These data indicate that LCLT supplementation is effective in assisting recovery from high-repetition squat exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


GPLC supplementation combined with eight weeks of aerobic exercise decreases lipid peroxidation and elevates nitric oxide, but does not further improve blood lipid profiles in normolipidemic subjects.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, L-carnitine increases activities of antioxidant enzymes and the total antioxidant capacity in healthy subjects. It may be useful as a supplementary therapy for chronic illnesses involving excessive oxidative stress.


test
Slightly Positive


L-carnitine supplementation to diet is useful for reducing TNF-alpha and CRP, and for improving liver function, glucose plasma level, lipid profile, HOMA-IR, and histological manifestations of NASH.


test
Slightly Positive


No interaction effects were noted. MDA was minimally effected by exercise but lower at rest for both GPLC groups following the intervention (p = 0.044). A time main effect was noted for H2O2 (p = 0.05) and XO (p = 0.003), with values increasing from pre- to postexercise. Both aerobic and anaerobic power testing increase oxidative stress to a similar extent. Exercise training plus GPLC can decrease resting MDA, but it has little impact on exercise-induced oxidative stress biomarkers.


test
Slightly Positive


GlycoCarn(R) resulted in a 13.7% decrease in MDA from pre- to post-exercise and yielded a non-significant but greater total volume load compared to all other conditions.


  • Lemon Balm for Antioxidant potential

  • Licorice for Antioxidant potential

  • Melatonin for Antioxidant potential

  • MSM for Antioxidant potential

  • Pomegranate Extract for Antioxidant potential

  • Psyllium for Antioxidant potential

  • Pycnogenol for Antioxidant potential

  • Pyrroloquinoline quinone for Antioxidant potential

  • Quercetin for Antioxidant potential

  • Resveratrol for Antioxidant potential

  • Rooibos for Antioxidant potential

  • Roselle for Antioxidant potential

  • Serrapeptase for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


Betamethasone showed significant analgesic activity from day 1. Ibuprofen and betamethasone were significantly more effective than placebo in reducing swelling. Trismus was least with betamethasone. A significant rise in temperature on the operated side occurred only on day 1 in all the groups. Serratiopeptidase did not showed significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory action. Mild-to-moderate adverse effects were reported.


test
Slightly Positive


Serratiopeptidase therapy may proved to be a useful alternative mode of conservative treatment. Larger study may be further helpful to establish the role of serratiopeptidase in CTS.


test
Slightly Positive


The degree of swelling in the serrapeptase-treated patients was significantly less than that in the placebo-treated patients at every point of observation after operation up to the 5th day (p less than 0.01 to p less than 0.05). Maximal swelling throughout all the post-operative points of observation was also significantly smaller in size in the serrapeptase-treated group than in the placebo-treated group. No side-effects were reported.


test
Slightly Positive


The difference is statistically significant (p = 0.013). Decreasing pain correlated for the most part with the reduction in swelling. Thus, the patients receiving the test substance more rapidly became pain-free than did the control groups. On the basis of these results, serrapeptase would appear to be an effective preparation for the post-operative reduction of swelling, in comparison with the classical conservative measures, for example, the application of ice.


test
Slightly Positive


The results showed dexamethazone was more effective in reduction of swelling and pain in comparison with serratiopaptidase. Both dexamethazone and serratiopaptidase had the same effect on trismus.


  • Shilajit for Antioxidant potential

  • Stephania tetrandra for Antioxidant potential

  • Stinging Nettle for Antioxidant potential

  • Vitamin B3 for Antioxidant potential

  • Vitamin C for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, the results indicate that 400 IU/day of vitamin E reduces membrane damage more effectively than vitamin C but does not enhance performance. Athletes are encouraged to include antioxidants, such as vitamin E and C, in their diet to counteract these detrimental effects of exercise. The data presented here suggests that 400 IU/day of vitamin E will provide adequate protection but supplementing the diet with 1 g per day of vitamin C may promote cellular damage. However neither of these vitamins, either alone or in combination, will enhance exercise performance.


test
Slightly Positive


Data analysis was carried out using Mann-Whitney U test with p < 0.05 being significant by SPSS software version 16.The result of the study showed a significantly decrease in fasting (p = 0.006) and postprandial MDA (p < 0.001) in vitamin C group compare to placebo group but not in lipid profile. This study suggests that vitamin C supplementation can decrease fasting and postprandial oxidative stress and may prevent diabetes complication.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, acute supplementation with a high dose of VC has little or no effect on the hormonal, interleukin-6, or immune response to prolonged exercise and combined ingestion of VC with CHO provides no additional effects compared with CHO alone.


test
Slightly Positive


In contrast, vitamin C supplementation decreased urinary concentrations of DHN-MA (three-way interaction p=0.0304) in nonsmoking men compared with nonsmoking women (p<0.05), as well as in nonsmoking men compared with smoking men (p<0.05). Vitamin C supplementation also decreased (p=0.0092) urinary total of metabolites by ~20%. Thus, HPNE metabolites can be reduced favorably in response to improved plasma ascorbic acid concentrations, an effect due to ascorbic acid antioxidant function.


test
Slightly Positive


In summary, oral AA supplementation ameliorates skeletal muscle oxidative stress during hyperinsulinaemia and improves insulin-mediated glucose disposal in people with type 2 diabetes. Findings implicate AA supplementation as a potentially inexpensive, convenient, and effective adjunct therapy in the treatment of insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes.


test
Slightly Positive


No significant correlations were found between post-race plasma vitamin C, oxidative, and saliva measures, except for a positive correlation between post-race serum cortisol and serum vitamin C (r=0.50, P=0.006). These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation in carbohydrate-fed runners does not serve as a countermeasure to oxidative and sIgA changes during or following a competitive ultramarathon race.


test
Slightly Positive


Oral supplementation of vitamin C is not associated with changes in markers of oxidation or endothelial activation in healthy male smokers.


test
Slightly Positive


Our findings suggest that that administration of 1,000 mg of ascorbic acid together with 400 IU of alpha-tocopherol could be useful in preventing or aiding in the treatment of age-related osteoporosis.


test
Slightly Positive


These data indicate that the regular consumption of 8 fl. oz. orange juice or supplemental vitamin C ( approximately 70 mg/day) effectively reduced a marker of lipid peroxidation in plasma.


test
Slightly Positive


These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation in carbohydrate-fed runners does not serve as a countermeasure to oxidative and immune changes during or after a competitive ultramarathon race.


test
Slightly Positive


These findings are the first to suggest that oral vitamin C supplementation provides an effective prophylaxis against exercise-induced free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in human diabetic blood.


test
Slightly Positive


These findings suggest that administration of 1,000 mg of ascorbic acid plus 400 IU of alpha-tocopherol for 6 months is not useful for diminishing oxidative stress and DNA damage in healthy elderly adults.


test
Slightly Positive


Uric acid and TAC were decreased in group I on all measurement days. However, we did not observe any differences in the clinical status of patients receiving vitamin C during the first ten days of stroke or after 3 months. Although administration of vitamin C (500 mg/day, iv) to ischemic stroke patients since the first day ischemic stroke resulted in elevated serum levels of antioxidants, it did not substantially improve the clinical and functional status of patients after 3 months.


  • Vitamin E for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


In the dose-ranging study there was a linear trend between the dosage of vitamin E and percentage reduction in plasma F2-isoprostane concentrations which reached significance at doses of 1600 IU (35+/-2%, p<0.035) and 3200 IU (49+/-10%, p<0.005). This study provides information on the dosage of vitamin E that decreases systemic oxidant stress in vivo in humans and informs the planning and evaluation of clinical studies that assess the efficacy of vitamin E to mitigate disease.


test
Slightly Positive


Plasma F(2)-isoprostanes increased 181% versus 97% during the race in E versus P, and lipid hydroperoxides were significantly elevated (P=.009) 1.5 h postrace in E versus P. Plasma antioxidant potential was significantly higher 1.5 h postrace in E versus P (P=.039). This study indicates that prolonged large doses of alpha-tocopherol supplementation did not affect plasma Hcy concentrations and exhibited pro-oxidant characteristics in highly trained athletes during exhaustive exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


The ability of tocopherols to reduce systemic oxidative stress suggests potential benefits of vitamin E supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes. In populations with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, supplementation with either alphaT or mixed tocopherols rich in gammaT is unlikely to confer further benefits in reducing inflammation.


test
Slightly Positive


TRE at doses up to 320 mg daily were well tolerated. Treatment significantly increased alpha, delta, and gamma tocotrienol concentrations but did not significantly affect arterial compliance, plasma TAS, serum TC or LDL-C levels in normal subjects.


test
Slightly Negative


It is concluded that neither topical steroid nor topical vitamin E is effective in reducing scar formation after grafting procedures for reconstruction for postburn contractures.


test
Slightly Negative


This study shows that there is no benefit to the cosmetic outcome of scars by applying vitamin E after skin surgery and that the application of topical vitamin E may actually be detrimental to the cosmetic appearance of a scar. In 90% of the cases in this study, topical vitamin E either had no effect on, or actually worsened, the cosmetic appearance of scars. Of the patients studied, 33% developed a contact dermatitis to the vitamin E. Therefore we conclude that use of topical vitamin E on surgical wounds should be discouraged.


  • Watercress for Antioxidant potential

  • Whey Protein for Antioxidant potential

  • Yerba mate for Antioxidant potential

  • Zinc for Antioxidant potential

  • Glutamine for Antioxidant potential


Body systems related to Antioxidant potential


Urinary System

Integumentary system

Immune System

Nervous System

Overall Systems
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