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Arginine

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What are Arginine's other names?

  • L-Arginine

What is Arginine's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 15 - 18 g
  • Recommended daily doses: 1 - 3

What supplements interact with Arginine?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Arginine help with?

  • Arginine for Oxidative Damage


What is Arginine used for?

  • Arginine for Antioxidant potential

  • Arginine for Weight loss

  • Arginine for Heart health

test
Slightly Positive


Among persons with IGT and MS, the supplementation of l-arg for 18 months does not significantly reduce the incidence of diabetes but does significantly increase regression to NGT.


test
Slightly Positive


In patients with PAD, long-term administration of L-arginine does not increase nitric oxide synthesis or improve vascular reactivity. Furthermore, the expected placebo effect observed in studies of functional capacity was attenuated in the L-arginine-treated group. As opposed to its short-term administration, long-term administration of L-arginine is not useful in patients with intermittent claudication and PAD.


test
Slightly Positive


Long-term oral L-arginine treatment resulted in an additive effect compared with a diet and exercise training program alone on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, it improved endothelial function, oxidative stress, and adipokine release in obese type 2 diabetic patients with insulin resistance.


test
Slightly Positive


NO(2) Platinum increased plasma L-arginine levels; however, the effects observed in hemodynamics, brachial-artery blood flow, and NOx can only be attributed to the resistance exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


Oral two-month supplementation with L-arginine (3 x 2 g/day) had no effect on fasting glucose and HbA1 level in diabetic patients with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease of lower extremities at Fontaine's stage II. The supplementation of L-arginine led to substantial increase in NO concentration and TAS level in these patients, suggesting its indirect antioxidative effect.


test
Slightly Positive


Our data show for the first time that oral L-citrulline supplementation raises plasma L-arginine concentration and augments NO-dependent signalling in a dose-dependent manner.


test
Slightly Positive


Restoring NO formation and endothelium-dependent vasodilation by L-arginine improves the clinical symptoms of intermittent claudication in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.


test
Slightly Positive


The increase in central arterial stiffness and wave reflection was not attenuated by acute supplementation with L-arginine; furthermore, blood flow was not augmented with supplementation. On the basis of these data, l-arginine does not appear to change the hemodynamic and vascular responses to resistance exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


The vascular effects of L-arginine are closely correlated with its plasma concentrations. These data may provide a basis for the utilization of L-arginine in cardiovascular diseases.


test
Slightly Positive


There was no significant difference between the 2 trials in plasma nitrate and nitrite, lactate and ammonia concentrations and peak and average power in the exercise. The results of this study suggested that short-term arginine supplementation had no effect on nitric oxide production, lactate and ammonia metabolism and performance in intermittent anaerobic exercise in well-trained male athletes.


  • Arginine for Muscle building

  • Arginine for Insulin control


What are Arginine's effects on the body?

  • Arginine for the Cardiovascular System

Among persons with IGT and MS, the supplementation of l-arg for 18 months does not significantly reduce the incidence of diabetes but does significantly increase regression to NGT.


In patients with PAD, long-term administration of L-arginine does not increase nitric oxide synthesis or improve vascular reactivity. Furthermore, the expected placebo effect observed in studies of functional capacity was attenuated in the L-arginine-treated group. As opposed to its short-term administration, long-term administration of L-arginine is not useful in patients with intermittent claudication and PAD.


Long-term oral L-arginine treatment resulted in an additive effect compared with a diet and exercise training program alone on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, it improved endothelial function, oxidative stress, and adipokine release in obese type 2 diabetic patients with insulin resistance.


NO(2) Platinum increased plasma L-arginine levels; however, the effects observed in hemodynamics, brachial-artery blood flow, and NOx can only be attributed to the resistance exercise.


Oral two-month supplementation with L-arginine (3 x 2 g/day) had no effect on fasting glucose and HbA1 level in diabetic patients with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease of lower extremities at Fontaine's stage II. The supplementation of L-arginine led to substantial increase in NO concentration and TAS level in these patients, suggesting its indirect antioxidative effect.


Our data show for the first time that oral L-citrulline supplementation raises plasma L-arginine concentration and augments NO-dependent signalling in a dose-dependent manner.


Restoring NO formation and endothelium-dependent vasodilation by L-arginine improves the clinical symptoms of intermittent claudication in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.


The increase in central arterial stiffness and wave reflection was not attenuated by acute supplementation with L-arginine; furthermore, blood flow was not augmented with supplementation. On the basis of these data, l-arginine does not appear to change the hemodynamic and vascular responses to resistance exercise.


The vascular effects of L-arginine are closely correlated with its plasma concentrations. These data may provide a basis for the utilization of L-arginine in cardiovascular diseases.


There was no significant difference between the 2 trials in plasma nitrate and nitrite, lactate and ammonia concentrations and peak and average power in the exercise. The results of this study suggested that short-term arginine supplementation had no effect on nitric oxide production, lactate and ammonia metabolism and performance in intermittent anaerobic exercise in well-trained male athletes.


  • Arginine for the Digestive System

  • Arginine for the Overall Systems

  • Arginine for the Endocrine System

  • Arginine for the Muscular System

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