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Black Cohosh

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What are Black Cohosh's other names?

  • Black Snake Root
  • Blackroot
  • Bugbane
  • Bugroot
  • Cimicifuga racemosa
  • Rattleroot
  • Snakeroot

What is Black Cohosh's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 20 - 40 mg
  • Recommended daily doses: 1 - 2

What supplements interact with Black Cohosh?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Black Cohosh help with?

  • Black Cohosh for Menopause

test
Slightly Positive


Black cohosh extract seems to be a reasonable treatment approach in tamoxifen treated breast cancer patients with predominantly psychovegetative symptoms.


test
Slightly Positive


Black cohosh used in isolation, or as part of a multibotanical regimen, shows little potential as an important therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms.


test
Slightly Positive


Black cohosh was not significantly more efficacious than placebo against most menopausal symptoms, including number and intensity of hot flashes. Our study illustrates the feasibility and value of standard clinical trial methodology in assessing the efficacy and safety of herbal agents.


test
Slightly Positive


Compared with placebo, black cohosh and red clover did not reduce the number of vasomotor symptoms. Safety monitoring indicated that chemically and biologically standardized extracts of black cohosh and red clover were safe during daily administration for 12 months.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion our exercise program favorably affected bone, menopausal symptoms, lean body mass, and, to a smaller extent, 10-year CHD risk in early postmenopausal women. Adjuvant supplementation of CR did not enhance these positive effects.


test
Slightly Positive


Our study suggested that remifemin was one effective and safe agent to manage women with climacteric symptom. It has similar therapeutic effect and lower incidence of adverse effect when compared with tibolone.


test
Slightly Positive


Results indicate that a red clover (phytoestrogen) supplement or black cohosh has no effects on cognitive function. CEE/MPA reduces objective hot flashes but worsens some aspects of verbal memory.


test
Slightly Positive


The lack of endometrial proliferation and improvement of climacteric complaints as well as only few gynecologic organ-related adverse events are reported for the first time after a treatment period of 1 year. Due to the improved benefit:risk ratio, it must be assumed that the Cimicifuga racemosa special extract BNO 1055 is a safe alternative for treatment of climacteric complaints.


test
Slightly Positive


The results support the effectiveness and tolerability profiles of two Black cohosh-based therapies for menopausal symptoms in general practice. They were used differentially: the monotherapy for neurovegetative symptoms, the combination for patients with more pronounced mood complaints. The fixed combination of Black cohosh and St. John's wort was superior to Black cohosh alone in alleviating climacteric mood symptoms.


test
Slightly Positive


This clinical study confirmed previous results, which clearly indicate the efficacy and tolerability of this proprietary black cohosh extract (Remifemin) in addressing menopausal symptoms, particularly hot flashes.


test
Slightly Positive


This trial failed to provide any evidence that black cohosh reduced hot flashes more than the placebo.


test
Slightly Positive


Using data from seven trials, we calculated a combined estimate for the change in menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Preparations containing black cohosh improved these symptoms overall by 26% (95% confidence interval 11%-40%); there was, however, significant heterogeneity between these trials. Given that black cohosh is one of the most frequently used herbal medications for menopausal vasomotor symptoms in North America, more data are warranted on its effectiveness and safety.


test
Slightly Positive


We concluded that use of C. racemosa for 1 year by healthy postmenopausal women without evidence of liver disease does not seem to influence the liver.


  • Black Cohosh for Coronary Artery Disease


What is Black Cohosh used for?

  • Black Cohosh for Emotional health

  • Black Cohosh for Women's health

test
Slightly Positive


Black cohosh extract seems to be a reasonable treatment approach in tamoxifen treated breast cancer patients with predominantly psychovegetative symptoms.


test
Slightly Positive


Black cohosh used in isolation, or as part of a multibotanical regimen, shows little potential as an important therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms.


test
Slightly Positive


Black cohosh was not significantly more efficacious than placebo against most menopausal symptoms, including number and intensity of hot flashes. Our study illustrates the feasibility and value of standard clinical trial methodology in assessing the efficacy and safety of herbal agents.


test
Slightly Positive


Compared with placebo, black cohosh and red clover did not reduce the number of vasomotor symptoms. Safety monitoring indicated that chemically and biologically standardized extracts of black cohosh and red clover were safe during daily administration for 12 months.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion our exercise program favorably affected bone, menopausal symptoms, lean body mass, and, to a smaller extent, 10-year CHD risk in early postmenopausal women. Adjuvant supplementation of CR did not enhance these positive effects.


test
Slightly Positive


Our study suggested that remifemin was one effective and safe agent to manage women with climacteric symptom. It has similar therapeutic effect and lower incidence of adverse effect when compared with tibolone.


test
Slightly Positive


Results indicate that a red clover (phytoestrogen) supplement or black cohosh has no effects on cognitive function. CEE/MPA reduces objective hot flashes but worsens some aspects of verbal memory.


test
Slightly Positive


The lack of endometrial proliferation and improvement of climacteric complaints as well as only few gynecologic organ-related adverse events are reported for the first time after a treatment period of 1 year. Due to the improved benefit:risk ratio, it must be assumed that the Cimicifuga racemosa special extract BNO 1055 is a safe alternative for treatment of climacteric complaints.


test
Slightly Positive


The results support the effectiveness and tolerability profiles of two Black cohosh-based therapies for menopausal symptoms in general practice. They were used differentially: the monotherapy for neurovegetative symptoms, the combination for patients with more pronounced mood complaints. The fixed combination of Black cohosh and St. John's wort was superior to Black cohosh alone in alleviating climacteric mood symptoms.


test
Slightly Positive


This clinical study confirmed previous results, which clearly indicate the efficacy and tolerability of this proprietary black cohosh extract (Remifemin) in addressing menopausal symptoms, particularly hot flashes.


test
Slightly Positive


This trial failed to provide any evidence that black cohosh reduced hot flashes more than the placebo.


test
Slightly Positive


Using data from seven trials, we calculated a combined estimate for the change in menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Preparations containing black cohosh improved these symptoms overall by 26% (95% confidence interval 11%-40%); there was, however, significant heterogeneity between these trials. Given that black cohosh is one of the most frequently used herbal medications for menopausal vasomotor symptoms in North America, more data are warranted on its effectiveness and safety.


test
Slightly Positive


We concluded that use of C. racemosa for 1 year by healthy postmenopausal women without evidence of liver disease does not seem to influence the liver.


  • Black Cohosh for Heart health


What are Black Cohosh's effects on the body?

  • Black Cohosh for the Nervous System

  • Black Cohosh for the Reproductive System

Black cohosh extract seems to be a reasonable treatment approach in tamoxifen treated breast cancer patients with predominantly psychovegetative symptoms.


Black cohosh used in isolation, or as part of a multibotanical regimen, shows little potential as an important therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms.


Black cohosh was not significantly more efficacious than placebo against most menopausal symptoms, including number and intensity of hot flashes. Our study illustrates the feasibility and value of standard clinical trial methodology in assessing the efficacy and safety of herbal agents.


Compared with placebo, black cohosh and red clover did not reduce the number of vasomotor symptoms. Safety monitoring indicated that chemically and biologically standardized extracts of black cohosh and red clover were safe during daily administration for 12 months.


In conclusion our exercise program favorably affected bone, menopausal symptoms, lean body mass, and, to a smaller extent, 10-year CHD risk in early postmenopausal women. Adjuvant supplementation of CR did not enhance these positive effects.


Our study suggested that remifemin was one effective and safe agent to manage women with climacteric symptom. It has similar therapeutic effect and lower incidence of adverse effect when compared with tibolone.


Results indicate that a red clover (phytoestrogen) supplement or black cohosh has no effects on cognitive function. CEE/MPA reduces objective hot flashes but worsens some aspects of verbal memory.


The lack of endometrial proliferation and improvement of climacteric complaints as well as only few gynecologic organ-related adverse events are reported for the first time after a treatment period of 1 year. Due to the improved benefit:risk ratio, it must be assumed that the Cimicifuga racemosa special extract BNO 1055 is a safe alternative for treatment of climacteric complaints.


The results support the effectiveness and tolerability profiles of two Black cohosh-based therapies for menopausal symptoms in general practice. They were used differentially: the monotherapy for neurovegetative symptoms, the combination for patients with more pronounced mood complaints. The fixed combination of Black cohosh and St. John's wort was superior to Black cohosh alone in alleviating climacteric mood symptoms.


This clinical study confirmed previous results, which clearly indicate the efficacy and tolerability of this proprietary black cohosh extract (Remifemin) in addressing menopausal symptoms, particularly hot flashes.


This trial failed to provide any evidence that black cohosh reduced hot flashes more than the placebo.


Using data from seven trials, we calculated a combined estimate for the change in menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Preparations containing black cohosh improved these symptoms overall by 26% (95% confidence interval 11%-40%); there was, however, significant heterogeneity between these trials. Given that black cohosh is one of the most frequently used herbal medications for menopausal vasomotor symptoms in North America, more data are warranted on its effectiveness and safety.


We concluded that use of C. racemosa for 1 year by healthy postmenopausal women without evidence of liver disease does not seem to influence the liver.


  • Black Cohosh for the Cardiovascular System

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