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Garlic

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What are Garlic's other names?

  • Ail
  • Ajo
  • Allium sativum
  • Camphor of the poor
  • Da suan
  • Lasun
  • Stinking Rose
  • Vegetable Viagra

What is Garlic's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 600 - 1200 mg
  • Recommended daily doses: 2 - 3

What supplements interact with Garlic?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Garlic help with?

  • Garlic for Immune System and Disorders

  • Garlic for Cancer

  • Garlic for Hepatopulmonary Syndrome

  • Garlic for Lead Poisoning

  • Garlic for Atherosclerosis

  • Garlic for Common Cold

  • Garlic for DNA Damage

  • Garlic for Exercise Capacity (with Heart Conditions)

  • Garlic for Oxidative Damage


What is Garlic used for?

  • Garlic for Immunity

test
Highly Positive


These results suggest that supplementation of the diet with aged garlic extract may enhance immune cell function and that this may be responsible, in part, for reduced severity of colds and flu.


test
Highly Positive


Volunteers taking placebo were much more likely to get more than one cold over the treatment period. An allicin-containing supplement can prevent attack by the common cold virus.


test
Moderately Positive


The chronic eating of garlic was found to maintain IFN-alpha at high levels for at least 7 days. The exposure of neutrophils to garlic in vivo or in vitro, which also stimulated synthesis of NO in these cells, was found to stimulate IFN-alpha synthesis as measured by the stimulation of IFN-alpha mRNA synthesis. Thus, consumption of garlic resulted in stimulated synthesis of NO and, in turn, IFN-alpha in humans, which could be beneficial in viral or proliferative diseases.


test
Slightly Positive


Drug compliance was relatively good in both the AGE and placebo groups. Although no difference was observed in QOL, both the number of NK cells and the NK cell activity increased significantly in the AGE group. No adverse effect was observed in either group. The study showed that administering AGE to patients with advanced cancer of the digestive system improved NK cell activity, but caused no improvement in QOL.


test
Slightly Positive


Thus, the results of this study have demonstrated that allicor is effective for non-specific prevention of acute respiratory infections in children and has no side effects. ARD prevention with benzimidazole appeared ineffective in placebo-controlled study, so the development of new useful and safe preparations is of ultimate importance.


  • Garlic for Overall health

  • Garlic for Heart health

test
Moderately Positive


After initial treadmill stress test, they were administered garlic oil in the dose of four capsules twice a day for 6 weeks and treadmill stress test was repeated. Garlic significantly (P<0.01) reduced heart rate at peak exercise and also significantly reduced the work load upon the heart resulting in better exercise tolerance (P<0.05) as compared to the initial test. It appears to be a good adaptogen to be utilized in patients with coronary artery disease.


test
Moderately Positive


Anethum has no significant effect on lipid profile, but garlic tablet has significant favorable effect on cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Garlic may play an important role in therapy of hypercholesterolemia.


test
Moderately Positive


Blood pressure readings were recorded at weeks 0, 12 and 24. Present study showed significant decrease in both Systolic and Diastolic blood pressure in both dose and duration dependent manner. In each garlic treated group, significant reduction in SBP and DBP (p<0.005) were observed when compared with atenolol (P<0.005) and placebo.


test
Moderately Positive


Chronic garlic powder intake attenuated age-related increases in aortic stiffness. These data strongly support the hypothesis that garlic intake had a protective effect on the elastic properties of the aorta related to aging in humans.


test
Moderately Positive


Further, a significant increase in vitamin levels and TAS was also observed in this group as compared to the control subjects. These findings point out the beneficial effects of garlic supplementation in reducing blood pressure and counteracting oxidative stress, and thereby, offering cardioprotection in essential hypertensives.


test
Moderately Positive


High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels improved only slightly, and triglycerides were not influenced significantly. Garlic preparations were highly tolerable in all trials and were associated with minimal side effects. They might be considered as an alternative option with a higher safety profile than conventional cholesterol-lowering medications in patients with slightly elevated cholesterol.


test
Moderately Positive


In addition, there was a 5.5% decrease in systolic blood pressure and a modest reduction of diastolic blood pressure in response to aged garlic extract. We conclude that dietary supplementation with aged garlic extract has beneficial effects on the lipid profile and blood pressure of moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects.


test
Moderately Positive


Mean LDL cholesterol concentration was 4.64 +/- 0.52 mmol/l on garlic and 4.60 +/- 0.59 mmol/l on placebo. There was no demonstrable effect of garlic on oxidisability of LDL, on the ratio of plasma lathosterol/cholesterol (a measure of cholesterol synthesis), nor on LDL receptor expression in lymphocytes. This study found no demonstrable effect of garlic ingestion on lipids and lipoproteins.


test
Moderately Positive


Meta-analysis of the controlled trials of garlic to reduce hypercholesterolemia showed a significant reduction in total cholesterol levels. The best available evidence suggests that garlic, in an amount approximating one half to one clove per day, decreased total serum cholesterol levels by about 9% in the groups of patients studied.


test
Moderately Positive


Our results show that ingestion of garlic leads to significantly lowered plasma and erythrocyte MDA levels and to increased activities of some antioxidant enzymes, which indicates that consumption of garlic decreases oxidation reactions. It is quite possible that reduced peroxidation processes due to garlic consumption may play a part in some of the beneficial effects of garlic in elderly subjects.


test
Moderately Positive


Our trial suggests aged garlic extract to be an effective and tolerable treatment in uncontrolled hypertension, and may be considered as a safe adjunct treatment to conventional antihypertensive therapy.


test
Moderately Positive


Our trial suggests that aged garlic extract is superior to placebo in lowering systolic blood pressure similarly to current first line medications in patients with treated but uncontrolled hypertension.


test
Moderately Positive


Since Allicor is the remedy of natural origin, it is safe with the respect to adverse effects and allows even perpetual administration that may be crucial for the secondary prevention of atherosclerotic diseases in CHD patients.


test
Moderately Positive


The available data suggest that garlic is superior to placebo in reducing total cholesterol levels. However, the size of the effect is modest, and the robustness of the effect is debatable. The use of garlic for hypercholesterolemia is therefore of questionable value.


test
Moderately Positive


The chronic eating of garlic was found to maintain IFN-alpha at high levels for at least 7 days. The exposure of neutrophils to garlic in vivo or in vitro, which also stimulated synthesis of NO in these cells, was found to stimulate IFN-alpha synthesis as measured by the stimulation of IFN-alpha mRNA synthesis. Thus, consumption of garlic resulted in stimulated synthesis of NO and, in turn, IFN-alpha in humans, which could be beneficial in viral or proliferative diseases.


test
Moderately Positive


The combination of garlic and fish oil reversed the moderate fish-oil-induced rise in LDL-C. Coadministration of garlic with fish oil was well-tolerated and had a beneficial effect on serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations by providing a combined lowering of total cholesterol, LDL-C, and triacylglycerol concentrations as well as the ratios of total cholesterol to HDL-C and LDL-C to HDL-C.


test
Moderately Positive


The difference between the verum and placebo group was highly significant (p less than 0.001). A mild garlic smell was observed in up to 21% of the verum group and up to 9% in the placebo group. Only one of the patients left the study for this reason. Standardized garlic tablets have been shown to be effective in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia by lowering total cholesterol values by an average of 12% and triglyceride values by an average of 17%.


test
Moderately Positive


The K:(M) for ADP-induced aggregation were approximately doubled after supplementation with AGE, whereas the maximum rate of aggregation was unaffected. No significant changes in plasma thromboxane B(2) and 6-ketoprostaglandin F(1alpha) concentrations or serum lipid profiles were observed. We conclude that AGE, when taken as a dietary supplement by normolipidemic subjects, may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease as a result of inhibiting platelet aggregation.


test
Moderately Positive


The obtained results are in good agreement with trials that have demonstrated the cardioprotective action of garlic preparations and may be due to the use of a time-released form of garlic powder tablets that provides a prolonged biological effect.


test
Moderately Positive


The present results have shown for the first time that the administration of AGE for 12 weeks increased plasma adiponectin levels in patients with MS. This suggests that AGE might be a useful, novel, nonpharmacological therapeutic intervention to increase adiponectin and to prevent cardiovascular (CV) complications in individuals with MS.


test
Moderately Positive


The reduction was evident after one month of therapy and persisted for at least six months. In the dried garlic powders, in which the allicin content is standardised, there was no significant difference in the size of the reduction across the dose range of 600-900 mg daily. Dried garlic powder preparations also significantly lowered serum triglyceride by 0.31 mmol/l compared to placebo (95% CI: -0.14, -0.49).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).


test
Moderately Positive


This small pilot study indicates the potential ability of AGE to inhibit the rate of progression of coronary calcification, as compared to placebo over 1 year. Should these findings be extended and confirmed in larger studies, garlic may prove useful for patients who are at high risk of future cardiovascular events.


test
Moderately Positive


We found that although serum lipid and lipoprotein levels were not lowered in this short time period, the ex vivo susceptibility of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to oxidation was significantly decreased (-34%). Because garlic has been reported to beneficially affect serum lipid levels, platelet function, fibrinolysis and blood pressure, this additional effect of retarding lipoprotein oxidation may contribute to the potential antiatherosclerotic effect of garlic.


test
Slightly Positive


A trend toward decreased susceptibility of lipoproteins to oxidation also was noted during AGE administration compared with the placebo period. We conclude that the beneficial effect of garlic preparations on lipids and blood pressure extends also to platelet function, thus providing a wider potential protection of the cardiovascular system.


test
Slightly Positive


It seems even more important that with garlic application the plaque volume in the whole collective remained practically constant within the age-span of 50-80 years. These results substantiated that not only a preventive but possibly also a curative role in arteriosclerosis therapy (plaque regression) may be ascribed to garlic remedies.


test
Slightly Positive


Platelet function is not impaired by single and repeated oral consumption of a dietary dose of garlic in healthy volunteers. Dishes containing socially acceptable doses of raw garlic are unlikely to increase the risk of perioperative bleeding. Further studies are warranted to determine the potential additive effects of platelet-inhibiting drugs combined with garlic and other herbs.


test
Slightly Positive


Thus, AGE exerts selective inhibition on platelet aggregation and adhesion, platelet functions that may be important for the development of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. We briefly review the effect of garlic preparations in general on cardiovascular risk factors and point out differences between AGE and other garlic preparations that we feel are important to explain the efficacy of AGE.


  • Garlic for Detox

  • Garlic for Muscle building

  • Garlic for Antioxidant potential

  • Garlic for Weight loss


What are Garlic's effects on the body?

  • Garlic for the Immune System

  • Garlic for the Digestive System

Garlic supplementation may be beneficial in patients with HPS for the reversal of intrapulmonary shunts as well as reducing hypoxemia and mortality.


The frequency of side effects was significantly (p=0.023) higher in d-penicillamine than in the garlic group. Thus, garlic seems safer clinically and as effective as d-penicillamine. Therefore, garlic can be recommended for the treatment of mild-to-moderate lead poisoning.


The K:(M) for ADP-induced aggregation were approximately doubled after supplementation with AGE, whereas the maximum rate of aggregation was unaffected. No significant changes in plasma thromboxane B(2) and 6-ketoprostaglandin F(1alpha) concentrations or serum lipid profiles were observed. We conclude that AGE, when taken as a dietary supplement by normolipidemic subjects, may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease as a result of inhibiting platelet aggregation.


The obtained results are in good agreement with trials that have demonstrated the cardioprotective action of garlic preparations and may be due to the use of a time-released form of garlic powder tablets that provides a prolonged biological effect.


The present results have shown for the first time that the administration of AGE for 12 weeks increased plasma adiponectin levels in patients with MS. This suggests that AGE might be a useful, novel, nonpharmacological therapeutic intervention to increase adiponectin and to prevent cardiovascular (CV) complications in individuals with MS.


  • Garlic for the Overall Systems

Apoptosis was detected by morphology of the cells and by flow cytometry. Ajoene induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in these cultures. Taking together the results of the in vivo and in vitro studies, we conclude that ajoene can reduce BCC tumor size, mainly by inducing the mitochondria-dependent route of apoptosis.


Further, a significant increase in vitamin levels and TAS was also observed in this group as compared to the control subjects. These findings point out the beneficial effects of garlic supplementation in reducing blood pressure and counteracting oxidative stress, and thereby, offering cardioprotection in essential hypertensives.


Our results show that ingestion of garlic leads to significantly lowered plasma and erythrocyte MDA levels and to increased activities of some antioxidant enzymes, which indicates that consumption of garlic decreases oxidation reactions. It is quite possible that reduced peroxidation processes due to garlic consumption may play a part in some of the beneficial effects of garlic in elderly subjects.


These results suggest that supplementation of the diet with aged garlic extract may enhance immune cell function and that this may be responsible, in part, for reduced severity of colds and flu.


This small pilot study indicates the potential ability of AGE to inhibit the rate of progression of coronary calcification, as compared to placebo over 1 year. Should these findings be extended and confirmed in larger studies, garlic may prove useful for patients who are at high risk of future cardiovascular events.


  • Garlic for the Cardiovascular System

After initial treadmill stress test, they were administered garlic oil in the dose of four capsules twice a day for 6 weeks and treadmill stress test was repeated. Garlic significantly (P<0.01) reduced heart rate at peak exercise and also significantly reduced the work load upon the heart resulting in better exercise tolerance (P<0.05) as compared to the initial test. It appears to be a good adaptogen to be utilized in patients with coronary artery disease.


Anethum has no significant effect on lipid profile, but garlic tablet has significant favorable effect on cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Garlic may play an important role in therapy of hypercholesterolemia.


Blood pressure readings were recorded at weeks 0, 12 and 24. Present study showed significant decrease in both Systolic and Diastolic blood pressure in both dose and duration dependent manner. In each garlic treated group, significant reduction in SBP and DBP (p<0.005) were observed when compared with atenolol (P<0.005) and placebo.


Chronic garlic powder intake attenuated age-related increases in aortic stiffness. These data strongly support the hypothesis that garlic intake had a protective effect on the elastic properties of the aorta related to aging in humans.


Further, a significant increase in vitamin levels and TAS was also observed in this group as compared to the control subjects. These findings point out the beneficial effects of garlic supplementation in reducing blood pressure and counteracting oxidative stress, and thereby, offering cardioprotection in essential hypertensives.


High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels improved only slightly, and triglycerides were not influenced significantly. Garlic preparations were highly tolerable in all trials and were associated with minimal side effects. They might be considered as an alternative option with a higher safety profile than conventional cholesterol-lowering medications in patients with slightly elevated cholesterol.


In addition, there was a 5.5% decrease in systolic blood pressure and a modest reduction of diastolic blood pressure in response to aged garlic extract. We conclude that dietary supplementation with aged garlic extract has beneficial effects on the lipid profile and blood pressure of moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects.


Mean LDL cholesterol concentration was 4.64 +/- 0.52 mmol/l on garlic and 4.60 +/- 0.59 mmol/l on placebo. There was no demonstrable effect of garlic on oxidisability of LDL, on the ratio of plasma lathosterol/cholesterol (a measure of cholesterol synthesis), nor on LDL receptor expression in lymphocytes. This study found no demonstrable effect of garlic ingestion on lipids and lipoproteins.


Meta-analysis of the controlled trials of garlic to reduce hypercholesterolemia showed a significant reduction in total cholesterol levels. The best available evidence suggests that garlic, in an amount approximating one half to one clove per day, decreased total serum cholesterol levels by about 9% in the groups of patients studied.


Our results show that ingestion of garlic leads to significantly lowered plasma and erythrocyte MDA levels and to increased activities of some antioxidant enzymes, which indicates that consumption of garlic decreases oxidation reactions. It is quite possible that reduced peroxidation processes due to garlic consumption may play a part in some of the beneficial effects of garlic in elderly subjects.


Our trial suggests aged garlic extract to be an effective and tolerable treatment in uncontrolled hypertension, and may be considered as a safe adjunct treatment to conventional antihypertensive therapy.


Our trial suggests that aged garlic extract is superior to placebo in lowering systolic blood pressure similarly to current first line medications in patients with treated but uncontrolled hypertension.


Since Allicor is the remedy of natural origin, it is safe with the respect to adverse effects and allows even perpetual administration that may be crucial for the secondary prevention of atherosclerotic diseases in CHD patients.


The available data suggest that garlic is superior to placebo in reducing total cholesterol levels. However, the size of the effect is modest, and the robustness of the effect is debatable. The use of garlic for hypercholesterolemia is therefore of questionable value.


The chronic eating of garlic was found to maintain IFN-alpha at high levels for at least 7 days. The exposure of neutrophils to garlic in vivo or in vitro, which also stimulated synthesis of NO in these cells, was found to stimulate IFN-alpha synthesis as measured by the stimulation of IFN-alpha mRNA synthesis. Thus, consumption of garlic resulted in stimulated synthesis of NO and, in turn, IFN-alpha in humans, which could be beneficial in viral or proliferative diseases.


The combination of garlic and fish oil reversed the moderate fish-oil-induced rise in LDL-C. Coadministration of garlic with fish oil was well-tolerated and had a beneficial effect on serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations by providing a combined lowering of total cholesterol, LDL-C, and triacylglycerol concentrations as well as the ratios of total cholesterol to HDL-C and LDL-C to HDL-C.


The difference between the verum and placebo group was highly significant (p less than 0.001). A mild garlic smell was observed in up to 21% of the verum group and up to 9% in the placebo group. Only one of the patients left the study for this reason. Standardized garlic tablets have been shown to be effective in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia by lowering total cholesterol values by an average of 12% and triglyceride values by an average of 17%.


The K:(M) for ADP-induced aggregation were approximately doubled after supplementation with AGE, whereas the maximum rate of aggregation was unaffected. No significant changes in plasma thromboxane B(2) and 6-ketoprostaglandin F(1alpha) concentrations or serum lipid profiles were observed. We conclude that AGE, when taken as a dietary supplement by normolipidemic subjects, may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease as a result of inhibiting platelet aggregation.


The obtained results are in good agreement with trials that have demonstrated the cardioprotective action of garlic preparations and may be due to the use of a time-released form of garlic powder tablets that provides a prolonged biological effect.


The present results have shown for the first time that the administration of AGE for 12 weeks increased plasma adiponectin levels in patients with MS. This suggests that AGE might be a useful, novel, nonpharmacological therapeutic intervention to increase adiponectin and to prevent cardiovascular (CV) complications in individuals with MS.


The reduction was evident after one month of therapy and persisted for at least six months. In the dried garlic powders, in which the allicin content is standardised, there was no significant difference in the size of the reduction across the dose range of 600-900 mg daily. Dried garlic powder preparations also significantly lowered serum triglyceride by 0.31 mmol/l compared to placebo (95% CI: -0.14, -0.49).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).


This small pilot study indicates the potential ability of AGE to inhibit the rate of progression of coronary calcification, as compared to placebo over 1 year. Should these findings be extended and confirmed in larger studies, garlic may prove useful for patients who are at high risk of future cardiovascular events.


We found that although serum lipid and lipoprotein levels were not lowered in this short time period, the ex vivo susceptibility of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to oxidation was significantly decreased (-34%). Because garlic has been reported to beneficially affect serum lipid levels, platelet function, fibrinolysis and blood pressure, this additional effect of retarding lipoprotein oxidation may contribute to the potential antiatherosclerotic effect of garlic.


A trend toward decreased susceptibility of lipoproteins to oxidation also was noted during AGE administration compared with the placebo period. We conclude that the beneficial effect of garlic preparations on lipids and blood pressure extends also to platelet function, thus providing a wider potential protection of the cardiovascular system.


It seems even more important that with garlic application the plaque volume in the whole collective remained practically constant within the age-span of 50-80 years. These results substantiated that not only a preventive but possibly also a curative role in arteriosclerosis therapy (plaque regression) may be ascribed to garlic remedies.


Platelet function is not impaired by single and repeated oral consumption of a dietary dose of garlic in healthy volunteers. Dishes containing socially acceptable doses of raw garlic are unlikely to increase the risk of perioperative bleeding. Further studies are warranted to determine the potential additive effects of platelet-inhibiting drugs combined with garlic and other herbs.


Thus, AGE exerts selective inhibition on platelet aggregation and adhesion, platelet functions that may be important for the development of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. We briefly review the effect of garlic preparations in general on cardiovascular risk factors and point out differences between AGE and other garlic preparations that we feel are important to explain the efficacy of AGE.


  • Garlic for the Respiratory System

  • Garlic for the Muscular System

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