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Green Tea Extract

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What are Green Tea Extract's other names?

  • Camellia sinensis
  • Green Tea Catechins
  • GTE

What is Green Tea Extract's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 400 - 500 mg

What supplements interact with Green Tea Extract?

  • Green Tea Extract and Caffeine

  • Green Tea Extract and Coenzyme Q10

  • Green Tea Extract and Curcumin

  • Green Tea Extract and Inositol

  • Green Tea Extract and Theaflavins

  • Green Tea Extract and Theanine

  • Green Tea Extract and Vitamin C

  • Green Tea Extract and Bacopa monnieri

  • Green Tea Extract and Fish Oil

  • Green Tea Extract and Quercetin

  • Green Tea Extract and Zinc


What can Green Tea Extract help with?

  • Green Tea Extract for Exercise-induced Fatigue

  • Green Tea Extract for Muscle Soreness

  • Green Tea Extract for Oxidative Damage


What is Green Tea Extract used for?

  • Green Tea Extract for Weight loss

test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, a single dose of green tea extract taken with a test meal decreases starch digestion and absorption.


test
Slightly Positive


Acute GTE ingestion can increase fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise and can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy young men.


test
Slightly Positive


After training, the average respiratory exchange ratio during exercise remained unchanged in the PLA group (post-training: 0.834 ± 0.008 vs pre-training: 0.841 ± 0.004), whereas it was lower in the GTE group (post-training: 0.816 ± 0.006 vs pre-training: 0.844 ± 0.005, P<0.05). These results suggest that habitual GTE ingestion, in combination with moderate-intense exercise, was beneficial to increase the proportion of whole-body fat utilization during exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


Catechins or an epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-caffeine mixture have a small positive effect on WL and WM. The results suggest that habitual caffeine intake and ethnicity may be moderators, as they may influence the effect of catechins.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, catechin-caffeine mixtures or a caffeine-only supplementation stimulates daily energy expenditure dose-dependently by 0.4-0.5 kJ mg(-1) administered. Compared with placebo, daily fat-oxidation was only significantly increased after catechin-caffeine mixtures ingestion.


test
Slightly Positive


Intake of decaffeinated green tea for 6 months was associated with a slight reduction in body weight and improved HDL and glucose homeostasis in overweight breast cancer survivors.


test
Slightly Positive


It was concluded that green-tea extract offers no additional benefit to cyclists over and above those achieved by using caffeine.


test
Slightly Positive


Low EGCG increases postprandial fat oxidation in obese men and this to the same extent as 200 mg caffeine, whereas high EGCG does not exert this effect. Fasting fat oxidation is increased only by caffeine (with or without EGCG). There is no synergism of low EGCG and 200 mg caffeine. Energy expenditure is not affected by EGCG.


test
Slightly Positive


Short-term consumption of EGCG increased VO2max without affecting maximal cardiac output, suggesting that EGCG may increase arterial-venous oxygen difference.


test
Slightly Positive


The maximum observed effect on EE of about 2 % could still be meaningful for energy balance over much longer period of exposure. However, higher short-term effects reported in the literature may reflect variations in green tea extracts, added caffeine, or synergies with physical activity. The specific mechanisms and conditions that may underpin observed longer-term benefits of catechin-enriched green tea consumption on body composition remain to be confirmed.


test
Slightly Positive


These findings suggest that EGCG alone has the potential to increase fat oxidation in men and may thereby contribute to the anti-obesity effects of green tea. However, more studies with a greater sample size and a broader range of age and BMI are needed to define the optimum dose.


test
Slightly Positive


These findings suggest that green tea catechin consumption enhances exercise-induced changes in abdominal fat and serum TG.


test
Slightly Positive


These findings suggest that ingestion of a catechin-rich beverage ameliorates serious obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors without raising any safety concerns in Japanese children.


test
Slightly Positive


This study showed no statistical difference in % reduction in BW, BMI and WC between the GTE and placebo groups after 12 weeks of treatment. The intake of GTE (491 mg catechins containing 302 mg EGCG) for 12 weeks is considered safe as shown by the results.


test
Slightly Positive


We also observed reductions in total body fat (GT2, 0.7 kg, P < 0.05) and body fat % (GT1, 0.6%, P < 0.05). We conclude that consumption of two servings of an extra high-catechin GT leads to improvements in body composition and reduces abdominal fatness in moderately overweight Chinese subjects.


  • Green Tea Extract for Muscle building

  • Green Tea Extract for Emotional health

  • Green Tea Extract for Mental health

  • Green Tea Extract for Skin, hair and nails

  • Green Tea Extract for Insulin control

  • Green Tea Extract for Antioxidant potential

  • Green Tea Extract for Heart health

test
Slightly Positive


A beneficial effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) was demonstrated, with a significant reduction of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels in eight weeks, in the patients studied.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, regular intake of EGCG had no effect on insulin resistance but did result in a modest reduction in diastolic blood pressure. This antihypertensive effect may contribute to some of the cardiovascular benefits associated with habitual green tea consumption. EGCG treatment also had a positive effect on mood. Further studies are needed to confirm the findings and investigate their mechanistic basis.


test
Slightly Positive


In summary, green tea (400- and 800-mg EGCG as PPE; ∼5-10 cups) supplementation for 2 months had suggestive beneficial effects on LDL-cholesterol concentrations and glucose-related markers.


test
Slightly Positive


Intake of decaffeinated green tea for 6 months was associated with a slight reduction in body weight and improved HDL and glucose homeostasis in overweight breast cancer survivors.


test
Slightly Positive


Moderate consumption of tea substantially enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilation. This may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced risk of cardiovascular events and stroke observed among tea drinkers.


test
Slightly Positive


These findings suggest that ingestion of a catechin-rich beverage ameliorates serious obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors without raising any safety concerns in Japanese children.


test
Slightly Positive


This study showed no statistical difference in % reduction in BW, BMI and WC between the GTE and placebo groups after 12 weeks of treatment. The intake of GTE (491 mg catechins containing 302 mg EGCG) for 12 weeks is considered safe as shown by the results.


test
Slightly Negative


Short-term consumption of EGCG increased VO2max without affecting maximal cardiac output, suggesting that EGCG may increase arterial-venous oxygen difference.


test
Slightly Negative


These results demonstrate that a single dose of orally administered EGCG can modulate CBF parameters in healthy humans but that this is not associated with changes in cognitive performance or mood.


  • Green Tea Extract for Overall health


What are Green Tea Extract's effects on the body?

  • Green Tea Extract for the Digestive System

In conclusion, a single dose of green tea extract taken with a test meal decreases starch digestion and absorption.


Acute GTE ingestion can increase fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise and can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy young men.


After training, the average respiratory exchange ratio during exercise remained unchanged in the PLA group (post-training: 0.834 ± 0.008 vs pre-training: 0.841 ± 0.004), whereas it was lower in the GTE group (post-training: 0.816 ± 0.006 vs pre-training: 0.844 ± 0.005, P<0.05). These results suggest that habitual GTE ingestion, in combination with moderate-intense exercise, was beneficial to increase the proportion of whole-body fat utilization during exercise.


Catechins or an epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-caffeine mixture have a small positive effect on WL and WM. The results suggest that habitual caffeine intake and ethnicity may be moderators, as they may influence the effect of catechins.


In conclusion, catechin-caffeine mixtures or a caffeine-only supplementation stimulates daily energy expenditure dose-dependently by 0.4-0.5 kJ mg(-1) administered. Compared with placebo, daily fat-oxidation was only significantly increased after catechin-caffeine mixtures ingestion.


In conclusion, regular intake of EGCG had no effect on insulin resistance but did result in a modest reduction in diastolic blood pressure. This antihypertensive effect may contribute to some of the cardiovascular benefits associated with habitual green tea consumption. EGCG treatment also had a positive effect on mood. Further studies are needed to confirm the findings and investigate their mechanistic basis.


Intake of decaffeinated green tea for 6 months was associated with a slight reduction in body weight and improved HDL and glucose homeostasis in overweight breast cancer survivors.


It was concluded that green-tea extract offers no additional benefit to cyclists over and above those achieved by using caffeine.


Low EGCG increases postprandial fat oxidation in obese men and this to the same extent as 200 mg caffeine, whereas high EGCG does not exert this effect. Fasting fat oxidation is increased only by caffeine (with or without EGCG). There is no synergism of low EGCG and 200 mg caffeine. Energy expenditure is not affected by EGCG.


Short-term consumption of EGCG increased VO2max without affecting maximal cardiac output, suggesting that EGCG may increase arterial-venous oxygen difference.


The maximum observed effect on EE of about 2 % could still be meaningful for energy balance over much longer period of exposure. However, higher short-term effects reported in the literature may reflect variations in green tea extracts, added caffeine, or synergies with physical activity. The specific mechanisms and conditions that may underpin observed longer-term benefits of catechin-enriched green tea consumption on body composition remain to be confirmed.


These findings suggest that EGCG alone has the potential to increase fat oxidation in men and may thereby contribute to the anti-obesity effects of green tea. However, more studies with a greater sample size and a broader range of age and BMI are needed to define the optimum dose.


These findings suggest that green tea catechin consumption enhances exercise-induced changes in abdominal fat and serum TG.


These findings suggest that ingestion of a catechin-rich beverage ameliorates serious obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors without raising any safety concerns in Japanese children.


This study found no statistical difference in any measured variable between the decaffeinated GTE and placebo groups; however, there were some statistically significant within-group changes detected. More research is required to determine whether a decaffeinated GTE standardized for EGCG content will provide any clinical benefits in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Clinical Trial Registration NO: NCT00567905.


This study showed no statistical difference in % reduction in BW, BMI and WC between the GTE and placebo groups after 12 weeks of treatment. The intake of GTE (491 mg catechins containing 302 mg EGCG) for 12 weeks is considered safe as shown by the results.


We also observed reductions in total body fat (GT2, 0.7 kg, P < 0.05) and body fat % (GT1, 0.6%, P < 0.05). We conclude that consumption of two servings of an extra high-catechin GT leads to improvements in body composition and reduces abdominal fatness in moderately overweight Chinese subjects.


The inverse relation between EGCG dose and fractional nonhaem iron absorption was linear (p = 0.0002). In this study the magnitude of the inhibitory action of EGCG on nonhaem iron absorption was found to be much lower than that reported in the literature for black tea and similar compounds. The doses of EGCG in supplements, which will be lower than those used in this study, are not expected to have any health relevant effects on iron absorption in subjects with normal iron stores.


  • Green Tea Extract for the Cardiovascular System

A beneficial effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) was demonstrated, with a significant reduction of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels in eight weeks, in the patients studied.


In conclusion, regular intake of EGCG had no effect on insulin resistance but did result in a modest reduction in diastolic blood pressure. This antihypertensive effect may contribute to some of the cardiovascular benefits associated with habitual green tea consumption. EGCG treatment also had a positive effect on mood. Further studies are needed to confirm the findings and investigate their mechanistic basis.


In summary, green tea (400- and 800-mg EGCG as PPE; ∼5-10 cups) supplementation for 2 months had suggestive beneficial effects on LDL-cholesterol concentrations and glucose-related markers.


Intake of decaffeinated green tea for 6 months was associated with a slight reduction in body weight and improved HDL and glucose homeostasis in overweight breast cancer survivors.


Moderate consumption of tea substantially enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilation. This may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced risk of cardiovascular events and stroke observed among tea drinkers.


These findings suggest that ingestion of a catechin-rich beverage ameliorates serious obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors without raising any safety concerns in Japanese children.


This study showed no statistical difference in % reduction in BW, BMI and WC between the GTE and placebo groups after 12 weeks of treatment. The intake of GTE (491 mg catechins containing 302 mg EGCG) for 12 weeks is considered safe as shown by the results.


Short-term consumption of EGCG increased VO2max without affecting maximal cardiac output, suggesting that EGCG may increase arterial-venous oxygen difference.


These results demonstrate that a single dose of orally administered EGCG can modulate CBF parameters in healthy humans but that this is not associated with changes in cognitive performance or mood.


  • Green Tea Extract for the Endocrine System

  • Green Tea Extract for the Nervous System

  • Green Tea Extract for the Muscular System

  • Green Tea Extract for the Integumentary system

  • Green Tea Extract for the Respiratory System

  • Green Tea Extract for the Overall Systems

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