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Peppermint

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What are Peppermint's other names?

  • Mentha balsamea
  • Mentha piperita
  • Menthol

What is Peppermint's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 450 - 750 mg
  • Recommended daily doses: 2 - 3

What supplements interact with Peppermint?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Peppermint help with?

  • Peppermint for Esophageal spasms

  • Peppermint for Headache

  • Peppermint for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

  • Peppermint for Colonic Diseases

  • Peppermint for Cracked Nipples

  • Peppermint for Gas

  • Peppermint for Irritability

  • Peppermint for Nausea and Vomiting

test
Slightly Positive


In a randomized, double-blind controlled trial, 42 children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were given pH-dependent, enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules or placebo. After 2 weeks, 75% of those receiving peppermint oil had reduced severity of pain associated with IBS. Peppermint oil may be used as a therapeutic agent during the symptomatic phase of IBS.


test
Slightly Positive


Overall satisfaction with postoperative nausea management was 86.9 +/- 4.1 mm and was independent of the treatment group. Aromatherapy effectively reduced the perceived severity of postoperative nausea. The fact that a saline "placebo" was as effective as alcohol or peppermint suggests that the beneficial effect may be related more to controlled breathing patterns than to the actual aroma inhaled.


test
Slightly Positive


Peppermint spirits may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of postoperative nausea. This study should be replicated with more participants, using a variety of aromatherapies to treat nausea in participants with different preoperative diagnoses.


test
Slightly Positive


They were found to be homogeneous for the purposes of the study. A statistically significant differences was demonstrated on the day of operation, using the Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0487. Using the Mann-Whitney test the difference was shown to be between the placebo and experimental group (U = 3; P = 0.02). The experimental group also required less traditional antiemetics and received more opioid analgesia postoperatively. The total cost of the treatment was 48 pence per person.


test
Slightly Positive


This study represents a successful example of the integration of a complementary therapy into mainstream midwifery practice and forms a basis for future research.


  • Peppermint for Pain


What is Peppermint used for?

  • Peppermint for Mental health

  • Peppermint for Digestion

test
Moderately Positive


A 4 weeks treatment with peppermint oil improves abdominal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.


test
Moderately Positive


Furthermore, Colpermin significantly improved the quality of life. There was no significant adverse reaction. Colpermin is effective and safe as a therapeutic agent in patients with IBS suffering from abdominal pain or discomfort.


test
Moderately Positive


In a randomized, double-blind controlled trial, 42 children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were given pH-dependent, enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules or placebo. After 2 weeks, 75% of those receiving peppermint oil had reduced severity of pain associated with IBS. Peppermint oil may be used as a therapeutic agent during the symptomatic phase of IBS.


test
Moderately Positive


Our double-blind cross-overtrial shows that it reduces abdominal symptoms in the irritable bowel syndrome.


test
Moderately Positive


So the study result concludes that peppermint oil is effective in reliving only abdominal pain in diarrhea predominant IBS transiently.


test
Moderately Positive


Symptom improvements after Colpermin were significantly better than after placebo (P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). One patient on Colpermin experienced heartburn (because of chewing the capsules) and one developed a mild transient skin rash. There were no significant changes in liver function test results. Thus, in this trial, Colpermin was effective and well tolerated.


test
Moderately Positive


This data demonstrates that peppermint oil improves the manometric features of DES.


test
Moderately Positive



test
Slightly Positive


Overall satisfaction with postoperative nausea management was 86.9 +/- 4.1 mm and was independent of the treatment group. Aromatherapy effectively reduced the perceived severity of postoperative nausea. The fact that a saline "placebo" was as effective as alcohol or peppermint suggests that the beneficial effect may be related more to controlled breathing patterns than to the actual aroma inhaled.


test
Slightly Positive


Peppermint spirits may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of postoperative nausea. This study should be replicated with more participants, using a variety of aromatherapies to treat nausea in participants with different preoperative diagnoses.


test
Slightly Positive


Premedication with Colpermin was beneficial in terms of the time required for cecal intubation and total procedure time, reducing colonic spasm, increasing endoscopist satisfaction and decreasing pain in patients during colonoscopy.


test
Slightly Positive


They were found to be homogeneous for the purposes of the study. A statistically significant differences was demonstrated on the day of operation, using the Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0487. Using the Mann-Whitney test the difference was shown to be between the placebo and experimental group (U = 3; P = 0.02). The experimental group also required less traditional antiemetics and received more opioid analgesia postoperatively. The total cost of the treatment was 48 pence per person.


test
Slightly Positive


This study represents a successful example of the integration of a complementary therapy into mainstream midwifery practice and forms a basis for future research.


  • Peppermint for Overall health

  • Peppermint for Women's health

  • Peppermint for Emotional health

  • Peppermint for Energy

  • Peppermint for Weight loss


What are Peppermint's effects on the body?

  • Peppermint for the Digestive System

A 4 weeks treatment with peppermint oil improves abdominal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.


Furthermore, Colpermin significantly improved the quality of life. There was no significant adverse reaction. Colpermin is effective and safe as a therapeutic agent in patients with IBS suffering from abdominal pain or discomfort.


In a randomized, double-blind controlled trial, 42 children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were given pH-dependent, enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules or placebo. After 2 weeks, 75% of those receiving peppermint oil had reduced severity of pain associated with IBS. Peppermint oil may be used as a therapeutic agent during the symptomatic phase of IBS.


Our double-blind cross-overtrial shows that it reduces abdominal symptoms in the irritable bowel syndrome.


So the study result concludes that peppermint oil is effective in reliving only abdominal pain in diarrhea predominant IBS transiently.


Symptom improvements after Colpermin were significantly better than after placebo (P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). One patient on Colpermin experienced heartburn (because of chewing the capsules) and one developed a mild transient skin rash. There were no significant changes in liver function test results. Thus, in this trial, Colpermin was effective and well tolerated.


This data demonstrates that peppermint oil improves the manometric features of DES.



Overall satisfaction with postoperative nausea management was 86.9 +/- 4.1 mm and was independent of the treatment group. Aromatherapy effectively reduced the perceived severity of postoperative nausea. The fact that a saline "placebo" was as effective as alcohol or peppermint suggests that the beneficial effect may be related more to controlled breathing patterns than to the actual aroma inhaled.


Peppermint spirits may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of postoperative nausea. This study should be replicated with more participants, using a variety of aromatherapies to treat nausea in participants with different preoperative diagnoses.


Premedication with Colpermin was beneficial in terms of the time required for cecal intubation and total procedure time, reducing colonic spasm, increasing endoscopist satisfaction and decreasing pain in patients during colonoscopy.


They were found to be homogeneous for the purposes of the study. A statistically significant differences was demonstrated on the day of operation, using the Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0487. Using the Mann-Whitney test the difference was shown to be between the placebo and experimental group (U = 3; P = 0.02). The experimental group also required less traditional antiemetics and received more opioid analgesia postoperatively. The total cost of the treatment was 48 pence per person.


This study represents a successful example of the integration of a complementary therapy into mainstream midwifery practice and forms a basis for future research.


The decrease in the T lag and beta constant suggests acceleration of gastric emptying during the early phase. This study showed that peppermint oil enhances gastric emptying, suggesting the potential use of peppermint oil in clinical settings for patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders.


  • Peppermint for the Nervous System

A significant analgesic effect with a reduction in sensitivity to headache was produced by a combination of peppermint oil and ethanol. The essential plant oil preparations often used in empiric medicine can thus be shown by laboratory tests to exert significant effects on mechanisms associated with the pathophysiology of headache.


Simultaneous application of 1,000 mg of acetaminophen and 10% peppermint oil in ethanol solution leads to an additive effect which remains below the significance threshold, however. The patients reported no adverse events. This controlled study showed for the first time that a 10% peppermint oil in ethanol solution efficiently alleviates tension-type headache. Peppermint oil thus proves to be a well-tolerated and cost-effective alternative to usual therapies.


Furthermore, Colpermin significantly improved the quality of life. There was no significant adverse reaction. Colpermin is effective and safe as a therapeutic agent in patients with IBS suffering from abdominal pain or discomfort.


In terms of subjective mood peppermint increased alertness and ylang-ylang decreased it, but significantly increased calmness. These results provide support for the contention that the aromas of essential oils can produce significant and idiosyncratic effects on both subjective and objective assessments of aspects of human behavior. They are discussed with reference to possible pharmacological and psychological modes of influence.


Premedication with Colpermin was beneficial in terms of the time required for cecal intubation and total procedure time, reducing colonic spasm, increasing endoscopist satisfaction and decreasing pain in patients during colonoscopy.


  • Peppermint for the Reproductive System

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