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Psyllium

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What are Psyllium's other names?

  • Ispaghula
  • Metamucil
  • Plantago
  • Plantago ovata
  • Plantago psyllium
  • Psyllium Fiber
  • Psyllium Husk

What is Psyllium's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 5 - 15 g
  • Recommended daily doses: 3

What supplements interact with Psyllium?

  • Psyllium and Calcium


What can Psyllium help with?

  • Psyllium for Gas

  • Psyllium for Ulcerative Colitis


What is Psyllium used for?

  • Psyllium for Digestion

test
Highly Positive


Bran had a greater effect on transit time than psyllium. Psyllium had a greater effect on the amount of water found in the stools and the total stool weight. On the days that stools were passed, 50% of the daily stool ratings were scored as "hard" when subjects received the control supplement. Less than 10% of the ratings were scored as "hard" when subjects received the high-fiber supplements. The type of marker used did not significantly affect the transit time measured.


test
Highly Positive


In contrast with other viscous fibers that are fermented completely in the colon, a component of psyllium is not fermented. This gel provided lubrication that facilitated propulsion of colon contents and produced a stool that was bulkier and more moist than were stools resulting with use of comparable amounts of other bowel-regulating fiber sources.


test
Highly Positive


Isogel was degraded preferentially to the food-derived fibre; in particular, cellulose in the faeces was increased during the experimental period. 6. Only one subject showed distinct decreases in the apparent digestibility of energy, N and fat in the diet. The results do not therefore agree with the generally held view that increased fibre in the diet decreases the apparent digestibility of the other nutrients.


test
Moderately Positive


Consumption of a high fibre diet retards intestinal gas transit by decreasing bolus propulsion to the rectum. Thus, in addition to increasing gas production by colonic flora, fibre ingestion may elicit gaseous symptoms by promoting gas retention.


test
Moderately Positive


Plantago ovata seeds (dietary fiber) might be as effective as mesalamine to maintain remission in ulcerative colitis.


  • Psyllium for Heart health

test
Slightly Positive


Dietary supplementation with 6 g/day of psyllium over 6 weeks improves fat distribution and lipid profile (parameters of the metabolic syndrome) in an at risk population of adolescent males.


test
Slightly Positive


During the cereal-plus-diet phase, no significant effects on HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, or body weight were found within or between any cereal groups. These results support use of soluble-fiber cereals as an effective and well-tolerated part of a prudent diet in the treatment of mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.


test
Slightly Positive


Fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides levels, showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05), whereas HDL cholesterol increased significantly (p < 0.01) following Psyllium treatment. Our results show that 5 g t.i.d. of Psyllium is useful, as an adjunct to dietary therapy, in patients with type II diabetes, to reduce plasma lipid and glucose levels, resolving the compliance conflict associated with the ingest of a great amount of fiber in customary diet.


test
Slightly Positive


However, a healthy diet provided the greatest improvements in BP in overweight and obese subjects. Further research with hypertensive individuals is necessary to elucidate whether increased fibre consumption in the form of psyllium supplementation may provide a safe and acceptable means to reduce BP, vascular function and the risk of developing CVD.


test
Slightly Positive


Measures of growth (height, weight, and skin-fold thicknesses), and blood vitamin (folic acid; vitamins A, D, and E) and mineral (iron, zinc, and calcium) levels were not affected. In this study, psyllium fiber had no additional lowering effect on total cholesterol or LDL-C levels in children who were already following low total fat, low saturated fat, low cholesterol diets.


test
Slightly Positive


The results obtained indicate a beneficial therapeutic effect of psyllium (Plantaben) in the metabolic control of type 2 diabetics as well as in lowering the risk of coronary heart disease. We also conclude that consumption of this fibre does not adversely affect either mineral or vitamin A and E concentrations. Finally, for a greater effectiveness, psyllium treatment should be individually evaluated.


test
Slightly Positive


There were no postprandial differences in the lipoprotein profile between the two groups. Triglycerides were significantly lower in G1, but not in G2. Our study contributes toward elucidating the effects of psyllium on serum lipids, and suggests that psyllium treatment may help in reducing triglycerides (a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease) in type II diabetic patients.


  • Psyllium for Antioxidant potential

  • Psyllium for Weight loss

  • Psyllium for Insulin control

test
Slightly Positive


During the cereal-plus-diet phase, no significant effects on HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, or body weight were found within or between any cereal groups. These results support use of soluble-fiber cereals as an effective and well-tolerated part of a prudent diet in the treatment of mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.


test
Slightly Positive


Fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides levels, showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05), whereas HDL cholesterol increased significantly (p < 0.01) following Psyllium treatment. Our results show that 5 g t.i.d. of Psyllium is useful, as an adjunct to dietary therapy, in patients with type II diabetes, to reduce plasma lipid and glucose levels, resolving the compliance conflict associated with the ingest of a great amount of fiber in customary diet.


test
Slightly Positive


Psyllium supplementation might be an additional therapeutic option for people with T2DM who are already receiving diabetes medication and who still experience elevated PPG concentrations. Further well-designed clinical trials and adjustment for confounding variables are needed to determine the role of a low glycemic index diet in the treatment of T2DM.


test
Slightly Positive


The results obtained indicate a beneficial therapeutic effect of psyllium (Plantaben) in the metabolic control of type 2 diabetics as well as in lowering the risk of coronary heart disease. We also conclude that consumption of this fibre does not adversely affect either mineral or vitamin A and E concentrations. Finally, for a greater effectiveness, psyllium treatment should be individually evaluated.


test
Slightly Negative


Dietary supplementation with 6 g/day of psyllium over 6 weeks improves fat distribution and lipid profile (parameters of the metabolic syndrome) in an at risk population of adolescent males.



What are Psyllium's effects on the body?

  • Psyllium for the Digestive System

Bran had a greater effect on transit time than psyllium. Psyllium had a greater effect on the amount of water found in the stools and the total stool weight. On the days that stools were passed, 50% of the daily stool ratings were scored as "hard" when subjects received the control supplement. Less than 10% of the ratings were scored as "hard" when subjects received the high-fiber supplements. The type of marker used did not significantly affect the transit time measured.


In contrast with other viscous fibers that are fermented completely in the colon, a component of psyllium is not fermented. This gel provided lubrication that facilitated propulsion of colon contents and produced a stool that was bulkier and more moist than were stools resulting with use of comparable amounts of other bowel-regulating fiber sources.


Isogel was degraded preferentially to the food-derived fibre; in particular, cellulose in the faeces was increased during the experimental period. 6. Only one subject showed distinct decreases in the apparent digestibility of energy, N and fat in the diet. The results do not therefore agree with the generally held view that increased fibre in the diet decreases the apparent digestibility of the other nutrients.


Consumption of a high fibre diet retards intestinal gas transit by decreasing bolus propulsion to the rectum. Thus, in addition to increasing gas production by colonic flora, fibre ingestion may elicit gaseous symptoms by promoting gas retention.


Plantago ovata seeds (dietary fiber) might be as effective as mesalamine to maintain remission in ulcerative colitis.


It increased the sensation of satiety and decreased hunger at the sixth hour after the meal. The association between echographic measurement and visual scales is a simple method of evaluating the relationship between the stomach and appetite. The pharmacodynamic effect of psyllium should be confirmed by longterm therapeutic trials.


The results obtained indicate a beneficial therapeutic effect of psyllium (Plantaben) in the metabolic control of type 2 diabetics as well as in lowering the risk of coronary heart disease. We also conclude that consumption of this fibre does not adversely affect either mineral or vitamin A and E concentrations. Finally, for a greater effectiveness, psyllium treatment should be individually evaluated.


There was no significant effect of breakfast type on total day energy intake. The results suggest that different types of fibre modulate the timecourse of appetite control and may produce alterations in the experience of motivation and patterns of eating without necessarily effecting total energy intake.


This plantago ovata containing product, which is already taken by many people world-wide to control bowel function, may be a useful supplement in weight control diets as it affects fat intake, and may have some effect on the subjective feeling of fullness.


  • Psyllium for the Cardiovascular System

Dietary supplementation with 6 g/day of psyllium over 6 weeks improves fat distribution and lipid profile (parameters of the metabolic syndrome) in an at risk population of adolescent males.


During the cereal-plus-diet phase, no significant effects on HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, or body weight were found within or between any cereal groups. These results support use of soluble-fiber cereals as an effective and well-tolerated part of a prudent diet in the treatment of mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.


Fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides levels, showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05), whereas HDL cholesterol increased significantly (p < 0.01) following Psyllium treatment. Our results show that 5 g t.i.d. of Psyllium is useful, as an adjunct to dietary therapy, in patients with type II diabetes, to reduce plasma lipid and glucose levels, resolving the compliance conflict associated with the ingest of a great amount of fiber in customary diet.


However, a healthy diet provided the greatest improvements in BP in overweight and obese subjects. Further research with hypertensive individuals is necessary to elucidate whether increased fibre consumption in the form of psyllium supplementation may provide a safe and acceptable means to reduce BP, vascular function and the risk of developing CVD.


Measures of growth (height, weight, and skin-fold thicknesses), and blood vitamin (folic acid; vitamins A, D, and E) and mineral (iron, zinc, and calcium) levels were not affected. In this study, psyllium fiber had no additional lowering effect on total cholesterol or LDL-C levels in children who were already following low total fat, low saturated fat, low cholesterol diets.


The results obtained indicate a beneficial therapeutic effect of psyllium (Plantaben) in the metabolic control of type 2 diabetics as well as in lowering the risk of coronary heart disease. We also conclude that consumption of this fibre does not adversely affect either mineral or vitamin A and E concentrations. Finally, for a greater effectiveness, psyllium treatment should be individually evaluated.


There were no postprandial differences in the lipoprotein profile between the two groups. Triglycerides were significantly lower in G1, but not in G2. Our study contributes toward elucidating the effects of psyllium on serum lipids, and suggests that psyllium treatment may help in reducing triglycerides (a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease) in type II diabetic patients.


  • Psyllium for the Endocrine System

During the cereal-plus-diet phase, no significant effects on HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, or body weight were found within or between any cereal groups. These results support use of soluble-fiber cereals as an effective and well-tolerated part of a prudent diet in the treatment of mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.


Fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides levels, showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05), whereas HDL cholesterol increased significantly (p < 0.01) following Psyllium treatment. Our results show that 5 g t.i.d. of Psyllium is useful, as an adjunct to dietary therapy, in patients with type II diabetes, to reduce plasma lipid and glucose levels, resolving the compliance conflict associated with the ingest of a great amount of fiber in customary diet.


Psyllium supplementation might be an additional therapeutic option for people with T2DM who are already receiving diabetes medication and who still experience elevated PPG concentrations. Further well-designed clinical trials and adjustment for confounding variables are needed to determine the role of a low glycemic index diet in the treatment of T2DM.


The results obtained indicate a beneficial therapeutic effect of psyllium (Plantaben) in the metabolic control of type 2 diabetics as well as in lowering the risk of coronary heart disease. We also conclude that consumption of this fibre does not adversely affect either mineral or vitamin A and E concentrations. Finally, for a greater effectiveness, psyllium treatment should be individually evaluated.


Dietary supplementation with 6 g/day of psyllium over 6 weeks improves fat distribution and lipid profile (parameters of the metabolic syndrome) in an at risk population of adolescent males.


  • Psyllium for the Urinary System

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