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Pycnogenol

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What are Pycnogenol's other names?

  • Pine Bark Extract
  • Pine Bark Procyanidins
  • Procyanidins

What is Pycnogenol's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 100 - 200 mg
  • Recommended daily doses: 2

What supplements interact with Pycnogenol?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Pycnogenol help with?

  • Pycnogenol for Edema

  • Pycnogenol for Osteoarthritis

  • Pycnogenol for Varicose Veins

  • Pycnogenol for Asthma

  • Pycnogenol for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

  • Pycnogenol for Menopause

  • Pycnogenol for Oxidative Damage


What is Pycnogenol used for?

  • Pycnogenol for Joint support

  • Pycnogenol for Heart health

test
Moderately Positive


Heart rate, electrolytes and blood urea nitrogen were not changed during treatment in both groups of patients. Unwanted effects observed in both groups were of mild and transient nature, such as gastrointestinal problems, vertigo, headache and nausea. Differences in rate of side effects were not statistically significant between the two groups. Study results support a supplementation with Pycnogenol for mildly hypertensive patients.


test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, Pycnogenol offers an option for reduction of treatment costs and side effects by sparing antiinflammatory drugs.


test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, Pycnogenol was found to be more efficacious than Venostasin for the treatment of CVI.


test
Moderately Positive


In conclusion, this study confirms the fast clinical efficacy of Pycnogenol in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and venous microangiopathy and its superiority-considering the evaluated parameters-to the combination of diosmin and hesperidin.


test
Moderately Positive


SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction.


test
Moderately Positive


This study provides the first evidence that the antioxidant Pycnogenol improves endothelial function in patients with CAD by reducing oxidative stress.


test
Slightly Positive


However, this reduction was not significant at 12th week. After 12 weeks of supplementation, Pycnogenol resulted in improved diabetes control, lowered CVD risk factors, and reduced antihypertensive medicine use vs controls.


test
Slightly Positive


While the LDL changes reversed during washout, the HDL increase did not. There was no significant difference in LDL oxidizability or plasma lipid peroxides following PYC supplementation. Hence, following oral supplementation in humans, PYC significantly increases antioxidant capacity of plasma, as determined by ORAC, and exerts favorable effects on the lipid profile.


  • Pycnogenol for Skin, hair and nails

  • Pycnogenol for Digestion

  • Pycnogenol for Antioxidant potential

  • Pycnogenol for Men's health

  • Pycnogenol for Mental health

  • Pycnogenol for Women's health

  • Pycnogenol for Energy

  • Pycnogenol for Emotional health

  • Pycnogenol for Immunity


What are Pycnogenol's effects on the body?

  • Pycnogenol for the Cardiovascular System

Heart rate, electrolytes and blood urea nitrogen were not changed during treatment in both groups of patients. Unwanted effects observed in both groups were of mild and transient nature, such as gastrointestinal problems, vertigo, headache and nausea. Differences in rate of side effects were not statistically significant between the two groups. Study results support a supplementation with Pycnogenol for mildly hypertensive patients.


In conclusion, Pycnogenol offers an option for reduction of treatment costs and side effects by sparing antiinflammatory drugs.


In conclusion, Pycnogenol was found to be more efficacious than Venostasin for the treatment of CVI.


In conclusion, this study confirms the fast clinical efficacy of Pycnogenol in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and venous microangiopathy and its superiority-considering the evaluated parameters-to the combination of diosmin and hesperidin.


SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction.


This study provides the first evidence that the antioxidant Pycnogenol improves endothelial function in patients with CAD by reducing oxidative stress.


However, this reduction was not significant at 12th week. After 12 weeks of supplementation, Pycnogenol resulted in improved diabetes control, lowered CVD risk factors, and reduced antihypertensive medicine use vs controls.


While the LDL changes reversed during washout, the HDL increase did not. There was no significant difference in LDL oxidizability or plasma lipid peroxides following PYC supplementation. Hence, following oral supplementation in humans, PYC significantly increases antioxidant capacity of plasma, as determined by ORAC, and exerts favorable effects on the lipid profile.


  • Pycnogenol for the Skeletal System

  • Pycnogenol for the Reproductive System

  • Pycnogenol for the Digestive System

  • Pycnogenol for the Respiratory System

  • Pycnogenol for the Nervous System

  • Pycnogenol for the Overall Systems

  • Pycnogenol for the Integumentary system

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