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TMG

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What are TMG's other names?

  • Betaine
  • Glycine betaine
  • Lycine
  • Oxyneurine
  • Trimethylglycine

What is TMG's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 2,5 - 5 g
  • Recommended daily doses: 2

What supplements interact with TMG?

  • TMG and Folic Acid


What can TMG help with?

  • TMG for Dry Mouth

  • TMG for Fatty Liver Disease

  • TMG for Liver Damage


What is TMG used for?

  • TMG for Heart health

test
Highly Positive


A hypoenergetic diet with betaine supplementation (6 g daily for 12 wk) decreased the plasma homocysteine concentration but did not affect body composition more than a hypoenergetic diet without betaine supplementation did.


test
Highly Positive


Betaine had no effect on serum lipid profile in long term in young healthy subjects. The lowering effect on plasma homocysteine concentration was weak.


test
Highly Positive


In conclusion, a single dose of orally administered betaine had an acute and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine concentration and resulted in lowered plasma tHcy concentrations within 2 h in healthy subjects.


test
Highly Positive


In conclusion, betaine appears to be highly effective in preventing a rise in plasma homocysteine concentration after methionine intake in subjects with mildly elevated homocysteine. It is not known whether this potential of betaine to "stabilize" circulating homocysteine concentrations lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease.


test
Highly Positive


Supplemental or dietary betaine similarly increase circulating betaine concentrations and attenuate the post-methionine load rise in homocysteine concentrations.


test
Highly Positive


The mean plasma tHcy concentration decreased by 1.1 (NS), 10.0 and 14.0 % (P<0.001) after supplementation with 1, 3 and 6 g betaine respectively. A further decrease in plasma tHcy by 5 % (P<0.01) was achieved by combining 1 mg folic acid with the 6 g betaine dose. Plasma betaine increased from 31 (sd 13) to 255 (sd 136) mumol/l in a dose-dependent manner (R(2) 0.97). We conclude that plasma tHcy is lowered rapidly and significantly by 3 or 6 g betaine/d in healthy men and women.


test
Highly Positive



test
Slightly Negative


Folic acid supplementation does not seem to affect blood lipids and therefore remains the preferred treatment for lowering of blood homocysteine concentrations.


  • TMG for Overall health

  • TMG for Detox

  • TMG for Muscle building

  • TMG for Digestion


What are TMG's effects on the body?

  • TMG for the Cardiovascular System

A hypoenergetic diet with betaine supplementation (6 g daily for 12 wk) decreased the plasma homocysteine concentration but did not affect body composition more than a hypoenergetic diet without betaine supplementation did.


Betaine had no effect on serum lipid profile in long term in young healthy subjects. The lowering effect on plasma homocysteine concentration was weak.


In conclusion, a single dose of orally administered betaine had an acute and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine concentration and resulted in lowered plasma tHcy concentrations within 2 h in healthy subjects.


In conclusion, betaine appears to be highly effective in preventing a rise in plasma homocysteine concentration after methionine intake in subjects with mildly elevated homocysteine. It is not known whether this potential of betaine to "stabilize" circulating homocysteine concentrations lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease.


Supplemental or dietary betaine similarly increase circulating betaine concentrations and attenuate the post-methionine load rise in homocysteine concentrations.


The mean plasma tHcy concentration decreased by 1.1 (NS), 10.0 and 14.0 % (P<0.001) after supplementation with 1, 3 and 6 g betaine respectively. A further decrease in plasma tHcy by 5 % (P<0.01) was achieved by combining 1 mg folic acid with the 6 g betaine dose. Plasma betaine increased from 31 (sd 13) to 255 (sd 136) mumol/l in a dose-dependent manner (R(2) 0.97). We conclude that plasma tHcy is lowered rapidly and significantly by 3 or 6 g betaine/d in healthy men and women.



Folic acid supplementation does not seem to affect blood lipids and therefore remains the preferred treatment for lowering of blood homocysteine concentrations.


  • TMG for the Endocrine System

  • TMG for the Muscular System

  • TMG for the Digestive System

A hypoenergetic diet with betaine supplementation (6 g daily for 12 wk) decreased the plasma homocysteine concentration but did not affect body composition more than a hypoenergetic diet without betaine supplementation did.


Betaine had no effect on serum lipid profile in long term in young healthy subjects. The lowering effect on plasma homocysteine concentration was weak.


Betaine is a safe and well tolerated drug that leads to a significant biochemical and histological improvement in patients with NASH. This novel agent deserves further evaluation in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.


Compared to placebo, betaine did not improve hepatic steatosis but may protect against worseningsteatosis [corrected]. High-dose betaine supplementation failed to reduce S-adenosylhomocysteine and did not positively affect any of the second hit mechanisms postulated to contribute to NASH that we studied. Although betaine has been proven effective in treating hepatic steatosis in several animal models, translating novel therapeutic options noted in animal studies to humans with NASH will prove challenging.


In conclusion, all the mildly flavoured toothpastes used in this study were well accepted by the xerostomic subjects. Thus, other toothpaste components may be more mucosa-irritating than just SLS, or else they enhance the effect of SLS. The detergent-free, BET-containing toothpaste appeared to be associated with relief of some symptoms of dry mouth.


No clinically significant adverse events were observed. These data suggest that the daily use of topical dry mouth products containing olive oil, betaine and xylitol is safe and effective in relieving symptoms of dry mouth in a population with polypharmacy-induced xerostomia.


No study-induced significant changes were observed in the microbiologic variables (plaque index, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, Candida species) or in the appearance of the oral mucosa. The use of the betaine-containing toothpaste was, however, associated with a significant relief of several subjective symptoms of dry mouth. Betaine appears thus to be a promising ingredient of toothpastes in general and especially of toothpastes designed for patients with dry mouth.


The daily use of a night guard and BET-containing mouthwash was seen to improve dry mouth during the 4-week duration of the study.


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