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Vitamin E

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What are Vitamin E's other names?

  • Tocopherols
  • Tocotrienols

What is Vitamin E's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 15 - 200 mg

What supplements interact with Vitamin E?

  • Vitamin E and Alpha-Lipoic Acid

  • Vitamin E and Coenzyme Q10

  • Vitamin E and Sesamin

  • Vitamin E and Vitamin C

  • Vitamin E and Aloe vera

  • Vitamin E and Gotu kola

  • Vitamin E and Coconut Oil

  • Vitamin E and Fish Oil


What can Vitamin E help with?

  • Vitamin E for Alzheimer's Disease

  • Vitamin E for Thromboembolism

  • Vitamin E for Ulcerative Colitis

  • Vitamin E for Atherosclerosis

  • Vitamin E for Cirrhosis

  • Vitamin E for Common Cold

  • Vitamin E for Fatty Liver Disease

  • Vitamin E for Hair Loss

  • Vitamin E for Liver Damage

  • Vitamin E for Muscle Soreness

  • Vitamin E for Oxidative Damage

test
Slightly Positive


In the dose-ranging study there was a linear trend between the dosage of vitamin E and percentage reduction in plasma F2-isoprostane concentrations which reached significance at doses of 1600 IU (35+/-2%, p<0.035) and 3200 IU (49+/-10%, p<0.005). This study provides information on the dosage of vitamin E that decreases systemic oxidant stress in vivo in humans and informs the planning and evaluation of clinical studies that assess the efficacy of vitamin E to mitigate disease.


test
Slightly Positive


Plasma F(2)-isoprostanes increased 181% versus 97% during the race in E versus P, and lipid hydroperoxides were significantly elevated (P=.009) 1.5 h postrace in E versus P. Plasma antioxidant potential was significantly higher 1.5 h postrace in E versus P (P=.039). This study indicates that prolonged large doses of alpha-tocopherol supplementation did not affect plasma Hcy concentrations and exhibited pro-oxidant characteristics in highly trained athletes during exhaustive exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


The ability of tocopherols to reduce systemic oxidative stress suggests potential benefits of vitamin E supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes. In populations with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, supplementation with either alphaT or mixed tocopherols rich in gammaT is unlikely to confer further benefits in reducing inflammation.


test
Slightly Positive


TRE at doses up to 320 mg daily were well tolerated. Treatment significantly increased alpha, delta, and gamma tocotrienol concentrations but did not significantly affect arterial compliance, plasma TAS, serum TC or LDL-C levels in normal subjects.


  • Vitamin E for Vascular Diseases

  • Vitamin E for Erythema

  • Vitamin E for Heart Failure


What is Vitamin E used for?

  • Vitamin E for Heart health

test
Moderately Positive


These data suggest that supplementation with vitamin E may reduce the risk of VTE in women, and those with a prior history or genetic predisposition may particularly benefit.


test
Slightly Positive


Analysis of secondary cardiovascular end points revealed that aspirin use was associated with no significant effect on the number of total MIs, fatal MIs, and nonfatal MIs, and a nonsignificant decrease in cardiovascular mortality. However, aspirin users did experience significantly fewer strokes, in particular ischemic strokes. Vitamin E had very little impact on the primary prevention of both cardiovascular events and cancer.


test
Slightly Positive


In patients with vascular disease or diabetes mellitus, long-term vitamin E supplementation does not prevent cancer or major cardiovascular events and may increase the risk for heart failure.


test
Slightly Positive


Increased DNA oxidative susceptibility, therefore, can occur in Type II diabetes without increased LDL oxidative susceptibility, but alpha-tocopherol supplementation in this regimen has no influence on DNA or LDL oxidative susceptibility in Type II diabetes or controls. Polymorphisms in the paraoxonase gene (position 192) are not associated with differences in oxidative susceptibility or responses to alpha-tocopherol.


test
Slightly Positive


Short-term daily oral supplementation with vitamin E improves EVF in both the conduit and resistance vessels of young subjects with type I DM.


test
Slightly Positive


The data from this large trial indicated that 600 IU of natural-source vitamin E taken every other day provided no overall benefit for major cardiovascular events or cancer, did not affect total mortality, and decreased cardiovascular mortality in healthy women. These data do not support recommending vitamin E supplementation for cardiovascular disease or cancer prevention among healthy women.


test
Slightly Positive


TRE at doses up to 320 mg daily were well tolerated. Treatment significantly increased alpha, delta, and gamma tocotrienol concentrations but did not significantly affect arterial compliance, plasma TAS, serum TC or LDL-C levels in normal subjects.


  • Vitamin E for Digestion

  • Vitamin E for Detox

test
Moderately Positive


Healthy status continued without any abnormal symptoms, and without any subjective complaints on the questionnaire. In the control group also, no changes occurred during the investigation. Gamma-tocopherol changes were measured in plasma and RBCs. As plasma and RBC tocopherol levels rose after administration, the isomer levels were suppressed in both plasma and RBCs.


test
Moderately Positive


It is concluded that megavitamin E supplements in this group produced no apparent toxic side effects and that subjective claims for beneficial effects were highly variable.


test
Moderately Positive


Our data suggest that the measurement of the level of plasma transforming growth factor-beta1 represents a possible method of distinguishing between non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and non-alcoholic fatty liver. Long-term alpha-tocopherol treatment may be safe and effective for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial is needed to confirm the full potential of alpha-tocopherol in the management of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.


test
Moderately Positive


Short-term vitamin E supplementation improves immune responsiveness in healthy elderly individuals; this effect appears to be mediated by a decrease in PGE2 and/or other lipid-peroxidation products.


test
Moderately Positive


Supplementation did cause a significant increase in serum vitamin E, and a small (5%) but significant (P < 0.05) increase in plasma zinc in the vitamin E-supplemented group. Thus, short-term supplementation with 800 mg vitamin E/d has no adverse effect on healthy older adults.


test
Moderately Positive


There was no significant effect of vitamin E on serum nonspecific immunoglobulin concentrations or anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. The cytotoxic ability of neutrophils against Candida albicans was not compromised. Thus, 4 mo of supplementation with 60-800 IU vitamin E/d had no adverse effects. These results are relevant for determining risk-to-benefit ratios for vitamin E supplementation.


test
Moderately Positive


Two years or longer treatment can be expected to ameliorate NASH fibrosis, especially in those whose serum transaminase activities and insulin resistance can be improved.


test
Moderately Positive


Vitamin E was superior to placebo for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in adults without diabetes. There was no benefit of pioglitazone over placebo for the primary outcome; however, significant benefits of pioglitazone were observed for some of the secondary outcomes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00063622.)


  • Vitamin E for Mental health

  • Vitamin E for Muscle building

  • Vitamin E for Antioxidant potential

test
Slightly Positive


In the dose-ranging study there was a linear trend between the dosage of vitamin E and percentage reduction in plasma F2-isoprostane concentrations which reached significance at doses of 1600 IU (35+/-2%, p<0.035) and 3200 IU (49+/-10%, p<0.005). This study provides information on the dosage of vitamin E that decreases systemic oxidant stress in vivo in humans and informs the planning and evaluation of clinical studies that assess the efficacy of vitamin E to mitigate disease.


test
Slightly Positive


Plasma F(2)-isoprostanes increased 181% versus 97% during the race in E versus P, and lipid hydroperoxides were significantly elevated (P=.009) 1.5 h postrace in E versus P. Plasma antioxidant potential was significantly higher 1.5 h postrace in E versus P (P=.039). This study indicates that prolonged large doses of alpha-tocopherol supplementation did not affect plasma Hcy concentrations and exhibited pro-oxidant characteristics in highly trained athletes during exhaustive exercise.


test
Slightly Positive


The ability of tocopherols to reduce systemic oxidative stress suggests potential benefits of vitamin E supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes. In populations with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, supplementation with either alphaT or mixed tocopherols rich in gammaT is unlikely to confer further benefits in reducing inflammation.


test
Slightly Positive


TRE at doses up to 320 mg daily were well tolerated. Treatment significantly increased alpha, delta, and gamma tocotrienol concentrations but did not significantly affect arterial compliance, plasma TAS, serum TC or LDL-C levels in normal subjects.


test
Slightly Negative


It is concluded that neither topical steroid nor topical vitamin E is effective in reducing scar formation after grafting procedures for reconstruction for postburn contractures.


test
Slightly Negative


This study shows that there is no benefit to the cosmetic outcome of scars by applying vitamin E after skin surgery and that the application of topical vitamin E may actually be detrimental to the cosmetic appearance of a scar. In 90% of the cases in this study, topical vitamin E either had no effect on, or actually worsened, the cosmetic appearance of scars. Of the patients studied, 33% developed a contact dermatitis to the vitamin E. Therefore we conclude that use of topical vitamin E on surgical wounds should be discouraged.


  • Vitamin E for Insulin control

  • Vitamin E for Skin, hair and nails

  • Vitamin E for Overall health

  • Vitamin E for Women's health

  • Vitamin E for Immunity


What are Vitamin E's effects on the body?

  • Vitamin E for the Digestive System

Healthy status continued without any abnormal symptoms, and without any subjective complaints on the questionnaire. In the control group also, no changes occurred during the investigation. Gamma-tocopherol changes were measured in plasma and RBCs. As plasma and RBC tocopherol levels rose after administration, the isomer levels were suppressed in both plasma and RBCs.


It is concluded that megavitamin E supplements in this group produced no apparent toxic side effects and that subjective claims for beneficial effects were highly variable.


Our data suggest that the measurement of the level of plasma transforming growth factor-beta1 represents a possible method of distinguishing between non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and non-alcoholic fatty liver. Long-term alpha-tocopherol treatment may be safe and effective for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial is needed to confirm the full potential of alpha-tocopherol in the management of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.


Short-term vitamin E supplementation improves immune responsiveness in healthy elderly individuals; this effect appears to be mediated by a decrease in PGE2 and/or other lipid-peroxidation products.


Supplementation did cause a significant increase in serum vitamin E, and a small (5%) but significant (P < 0.05) increase in plasma zinc in the vitamin E-supplemented group. Thus, short-term supplementation with 800 mg vitamin E/d has no adverse effect on healthy older adults.


There was no significant effect of vitamin E on serum nonspecific immunoglobulin concentrations or anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. The cytotoxic ability of neutrophils against Candida albicans was not compromised. Thus, 4 mo of supplementation with 60-800 IU vitamin E/d had no adverse effects. These results are relevant for determining risk-to-benefit ratios for vitamin E supplementation.


This preliminary report suggests that rectal d-alpha tocopherol may represent a novel therapy for mild and moderately active UC. The observed results might be due to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties of vitamin E.


Two years or longer treatment can be expected to ameliorate NASH fibrosis, especially in those whose serum transaminase activities and insulin resistance can be improved.


Vitamin E was superior to placebo for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in adults without diabetes. There was no benefit of pioglitazone over placebo for the primary outcome; however, significant benefits of pioglitazone were observed for some of the secondary outcomes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00063622.)


  • Vitamin E for the Cardiovascular System

These data suggest that supplementation with vitamin E may reduce the risk of VTE in women, and those with a prior history or genetic predisposition may particularly benefit.


Analysis of secondary cardiovascular end points revealed that aspirin use was associated with no significant effect on the number of total MIs, fatal MIs, and nonfatal MIs, and a nonsignificant decrease in cardiovascular mortality. However, aspirin users did experience significantly fewer strokes, in particular ischemic strokes. Vitamin E had very little impact on the primary prevention of both cardiovascular events and cancer.


In patients with vascular disease or diabetes mellitus, long-term vitamin E supplementation does not prevent cancer or major cardiovascular events and may increase the risk for heart failure.


Increased DNA oxidative susceptibility, therefore, can occur in Type II diabetes without increased LDL oxidative susceptibility, but alpha-tocopherol supplementation in this regimen has no influence on DNA or LDL oxidative susceptibility in Type II diabetes or controls. Polymorphisms in the paraoxonase gene (position 192) are not associated with differences in oxidative susceptibility or responses to alpha-tocopherol.


Short-term daily oral supplementation with vitamin E improves EVF in both the conduit and resistance vessels of young subjects with type I DM.


The data from this large trial indicated that 600 IU of natural-source vitamin E taken every other day provided no overall benefit for major cardiovascular events or cancer, did not affect total mortality, and decreased cardiovascular mortality in healthy women. These data do not support recommending vitamin E supplementation for cardiovascular disease or cancer prevention among healthy women.


TRE at doses up to 320 mg daily were well tolerated. Treatment significantly increased alpha, delta, and gamma tocotrienol concentrations but did not significantly affect arterial compliance, plasma TAS, serum TC or LDL-C levels in normal subjects.


  • Vitamin E for the Nervous System

  • Vitamin E for the Endocrine System

  • Vitamin E for the Muscular System

  • Vitamin E for the Respiratory System

  • Vitamin E for the Overall Systems

In the dose-ranging study there was a linear trend between the dosage of vitamin E and percentage reduction in plasma F2-isoprostane concentrations which reached significance at doses of 1600 IU (35+/-2%, p<0.035) and 3200 IU (49+/-10%, p<0.005). This study provides information on the dosage of vitamin E that decreases systemic oxidant stress in vivo in humans and informs the planning and evaluation of clinical studies that assess the efficacy of vitamin E to mitigate disease.


Plasma F(2)-isoprostanes increased 181% versus 97% during the race in E versus P, and lipid hydroperoxides were significantly elevated (P=.009) 1.5 h postrace in E versus P. Plasma antioxidant potential was significantly higher 1.5 h postrace in E versus P (P=.039). This study indicates that prolonged large doses of alpha-tocopherol supplementation did not affect plasma Hcy concentrations and exhibited pro-oxidant characteristics in highly trained athletes during exhaustive exercise.


Short-term vitamin E supplementation improves immune responsiveness in healthy elderly individuals; this effect appears to be mediated by a decrease in PGE2 and/or other lipid-peroxidation products.


The ability of tocopherols to reduce systemic oxidative stress suggests potential benefits of vitamin E supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes. In populations with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, supplementation with either alphaT or mixed tocopherols rich in gammaT is unlikely to confer further benefits in reducing inflammation.


TRE at doses up to 320 mg daily were well tolerated. Treatment significantly increased alpha, delta, and gamma tocotrienol concentrations but did not significantly affect arterial compliance, plasma TAS, serum TC or LDL-C levels in normal subjects.


  • Vitamin E for the Immune System

  • Vitamin E for the Integumentary system

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