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Vitamin K

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What are Vitamin K's other names?

  • Menaquinone
  • Menatetrenone
  • MK-4
  • MK-7
  • Phylloquinone
  • Phytonadione

What is Vitamin K's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 50 - 1000 mcg

What supplements interact with Vitamin K?

  • Vitamin K and Magnesium

  • Vitamin K and Vitamin C

  • Vitamin K and Calcium

  • Vitamin K and Sesamin

  • Vitamin K and Vitamin D


What can Vitamin K help with?

  • Vitamin K for Cancer

  • Vitamin K for Fractures

  • Vitamin K for Liver Cancer

  • Vitamin K for Erythema


What is Vitamin K used for?

  • Vitamin K for Detox

  • Vitamin K for Overall health

  • Vitamin K for Joint support

test
Moderately Positive


BAP had decreased at month 3 in group A (P < 0.05), but not in group B. BMD of the lumbar spine was significantly reduced after 6 months (P < 0.01), and 12 months (P < 0.001) of treatment in group A, whereas there was no remarkable change in group B. The present study demonstrated that the inhibition exerted by vitamin K2 of the reduction in OPG induced by GC may, at least in part, play a role in the prevention and treatment of GC-induced bone loss.


test
Moderately Positive


Continuous combination therapy with vitamin K(2) and D(3) may be useful for increasing vertebral bone mass in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the increase in coagulation function observed during this therapy was within the physiological range, and no adverse reactions were observed.


test
Moderately Positive


If co-administered with minerals and vitamin D, vitamin K1 may substantially contribute to reducing postmenopausal bone loss at the site of the femoral neck.


test
Moderately Positive


MK-7 supplements may help postmenopausal women to prevent bone loss. Whether these results can be extrapolated to other populations, e.g., children and men, needs further investigation.


test
Moderately Positive


One year of vitamin K2 supplement suggest a favorable effect on lumbar spine BMD with different response in lung and heart recipients. Vitamin D status should receive more attention.


test
Moderately Positive


Phylloquinone and MK4 treatment reduced serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin but did not alter BSALP or NTX. No effect of phylloquinone or MK4 on lumbar spine or proximal femur BMD or proximal femur geometric parameters was observed. This study does not support a role for vitamin K supplementation in osteoporosis prevention among healthy, postmenopausal, North American women receiving calcium and vitamin D supplementation.


test
Moderately Positive


Phylloquinone supplementation in a dose attainable in the diet does not confer any additional benefit for bone health at the spine or hip when taken with recommended amounts of calcium and vitamin D.


test
Moderately Positive


Poor vitamin K status was associated with high concentrations of cytokines involved in bone turnover, but vitamin K supplementation did not confer a decrease in cytokine concentrations. The healthy status of this cohort may explain a lack of effect of vitamin K supplementation on cytokine concentrations. This trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00183001.


test
Moderately Positive


The forearm BMD was significantly lower after 12 months than at 6 months in the control group. However, there was no significant decrease in BMD in the MK-4 group during the study period. These results suggest that low-dose MK-4 supplementation for 6-12 months improved bone quality in the postmenopausal Japanese women by decreasing the serum ucOC and pentosidine concentrations, without any substantial adverse effects.


test
Moderately Positive


The rate of bone loss in all three subgroups of female athletes was unexpectedly high; neither estrogen nor vitamin K supplementation prevented bone loss.


test
Moderately Positive


These findings suggest that vitamin K2 treatment effectively prevents the occurrence of new fractures, although the vitamin K2-treated group failed to increase in LBMD. Furthermore, vitamin K2 treatment enhances gamma-carboxylation of the OC molecule.


test
Moderately Positive


Treatment with 45 mg vitamin K2 with 1500 mg calcium per day for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 48 weeks resulted in a significant increase in lumbar BMD and a significant decrease in undercarboxylated OC levels.


test
Moderately Positive


Vitamin K(2) helps maintaining bone strength at the site of the femoral neck in postmenopausal women by improving BMC and FNW, whereas it has little effect on DXA-BMD.


test
Moderately Positive


Vitamin K2 therapy may be a useful method for preventing postmenopausal spinal bone mineral loss. In addition, the therapy should be started early in postmenopausal period.


test
Moderately Positive



  • Vitamin K for Skin, hair and nails

  • Vitamin K for Insulin control


What are Vitamin K's effects on the body?

  • Vitamin K for the Digestive System

  • Vitamin K for the Skeletal System

BAP had decreased at month 3 in group A (P < 0.05), but not in group B. BMD of the lumbar spine was significantly reduced after 6 months (P < 0.01), and 12 months (P < 0.001) of treatment in group A, whereas there was no remarkable change in group B. The present study demonstrated that the inhibition exerted by vitamin K2 of the reduction in OPG induced by GC may, at least in part, play a role in the prevention and treatment of GC-induced bone loss.


Continuous combination therapy with vitamin K(2) and D(3) may be useful for increasing vertebral bone mass in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the increase in coagulation function observed during this therapy was within the physiological range, and no adverse reactions were observed.


If co-administered with minerals and vitamin D, vitamin K1 may substantially contribute to reducing postmenopausal bone loss at the site of the femoral neck.


MK-7 supplements may help postmenopausal women to prevent bone loss. Whether these results can be extrapolated to other populations, e.g., children and men, needs further investigation.


One year of vitamin K2 supplement suggest a favorable effect on lumbar spine BMD with different response in lung and heart recipients. Vitamin D status should receive more attention.


Phylloquinone and MK4 treatment reduced serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin but did not alter BSALP or NTX. No effect of phylloquinone or MK4 on lumbar spine or proximal femur BMD or proximal femur geometric parameters was observed. This study does not support a role for vitamin K supplementation in osteoporosis prevention among healthy, postmenopausal, North American women receiving calcium and vitamin D supplementation.


Phylloquinone supplementation in a dose attainable in the diet does not confer any additional benefit for bone health at the spine or hip when taken with recommended amounts of calcium and vitamin D.


Poor vitamin K status was associated with high concentrations of cytokines involved in bone turnover, but vitamin K supplementation did not confer a decrease in cytokine concentrations. The healthy status of this cohort may explain a lack of effect of vitamin K supplementation on cytokine concentrations. This trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00183001.


The forearm BMD was significantly lower after 12 months than at 6 months in the control group. However, there was no significant decrease in BMD in the MK-4 group during the study period. These results suggest that low-dose MK-4 supplementation for 6-12 months improved bone quality in the postmenopausal Japanese women by decreasing the serum ucOC and pentosidine concentrations, without any substantial adverse effects.


The rate of bone loss in all three subgroups of female athletes was unexpectedly high; neither estrogen nor vitamin K supplementation prevented bone loss.


These findings suggest that vitamin K2 treatment effectively prevents the occurrence of new fractures, although the vitamin K2-treated group failed to increase in LBMD. Furthermore, vitamin K2 treatment enhances gamma-carboxylation of the OC molecule.


Treatment with 45 mg vitamin K2 with 1500 mg calcium per day for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 48 weeks resulted in a significant increase in lumbar BMD and a significant decrease in undercarboxylated OC levels.


Vitamin K(2) helps maintaining bone strength at the site of the femoral neck in postmenopausal women by improving BMC and FNW, whereas it has little effect on DXA-BMD.


Vitamin K2 therapy may be a useful method for preventing postmenopausal spinal bone mineral loss. In addition, the therapy should be started early in postmenopausal period.



  • Vitamin K for the Overall Systems

  • Vitamin K for the Integumentary system

  • Vitamin K for the Endocrine System

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