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Conjugated Linoleic Acid

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What are Conjugated Linoleic Acid's other names?

  • CLA
  • Rumenic Acid

What is Conjugated Linoleic Acid's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 3,2 - 6,4 g

What supplements interact with Conjugated Linoleic Acid?

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Seaweed Extract


What can Conjugated Linoleic Acid help with?

No studies that show the effects of this supplement on health conditions.

What is Conjugated Linoleic Acid used for?

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Antioxidant potential

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Muscle building

test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, although no detrimental effects were caused by supplementation, these results do not confirm a role for CLA in either body weight or blood lipid regulation in humans.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, mixed-isomer CLA supplementation had a favourable effect on serum insulin and NEFA response to oral glucose in non-obese, regularly exercising women, but there were no CLA-specific effects on body composition, energy expenditure or appetite.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, the regain of fat-free mass was favorably, dose-independently affected by a 13-week consumption of 1.8 or 3.6 g CLA/day and consequently increased the resting metabolic rate. However, it did not result in improved body weight maintenance after weight loss.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, this study shows that CLA supplementation for 24 mo in healthy, overweight adults was well tolerated. It confirms also that CLA decreases BFM in overweight humans, and may help maintain initial reductions in BFM and weight in the long term.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, whereas CLA may increase lean body mass in obese humans, it may also increase markers of inflammation in the short term.


test
Slightly Positive


In summary, supplementation with CLA plus n-3 LC-PUFA prevents increased abdominal fat mass and raises fat-free mass and adiponectin levels in younger obese individuals without deleteriously affecting insulin sensitivity, whereas these parameters in young and older lean and older obese individuals were unaffected, apart from increased fasting glucose in older obese men.


test
Slightly Positive


Long-term supplementation with CLA-FFA or CLA-triacylglycerol reduces BFM in healthy overweight adults.


test
Slightly Positive


Supplementation with CLA and SAF exerted different effects on BMI, total and trunk adipose mass, and lean tissue mass in obese postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. Supplementation with these dietary oils may be beneficial for weight loss, glycemic control, or both.


test
Slightly Positive


Supplementation with CLA during resistance training results in relatively small changes in body composition accompanied by a lessening of the catabolic effect of training on muscle protein.


test
Slightly Positive


The data suggest that conjugated linoleic acid may reduce BFM in humans and that no additional effect on BFM is achieved with doses > 3.4 g CLA/d.


test
Slightly Positive


The present results suggest that a 98 d supplementation diet with a 50 : 50 mixture of the two CLA isomers cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 in a dairy product was unable to alter body composition, although a significant increase in the RMR has been induced. Moreover, changes in mRNA PPAR gamma and HSL in adipose tissue were recorded.


test
Slightly Positive


The supplementation of CLA for 12 wk in overweight and grade I obese Chinese subjects yielded lower obesity indices, with no obvious adverse effects.


  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Weight loss

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Heart health

test
Slightly Negative


At biweekly visits, subjects completed a questionnaire evaluating side effects and adverse events. Blood was taken for assay of liver function, glucose, insulin, serum lipids, blood counts, and general chemistry. Overall, body composition did not differ between groups. Laboratory tests showed no adverse effects of CLA. Adverse events and side effects were less in the CLA group compared to placebo. We conclude that CLA as Clarinol is safe for use in obese humans for at least one year.


test
Slightly Negative


In conclusion, oil containing trans-10,cis-12 CLA has several adverse effects on classical and novel markers of coronary vascular disease, whereas the c9,t11 CLA isomer is more neutral, except for a small but significant increase in lipid peroxidation compared with olive oil.


test
Slightly Negative


In conclusion, when given as part of a diet rich in butter, a mixture of CLA isomers increased lipid peroxidation but did not affect risk markers of cardiovascular disease, inflammation, or fasting insulin and glucose concentrations.


test
Slightly Negative


It was shown that both CLA and exercise were effective in improvement of body composition and these effects were cumulated when they have been used together. CLA supplementation alone or with exercise seems effective on serum glucose and insulin concentrations but ineffective on endurance performance.


test
Slightly Negative


Results from this study fail to support the role of milk enriched naturally with CLA containing c-9, t-11 or synthetically with c-9, t-11 and t-10, c-12 CLA isomers in modulation of lipid profiles or body composition in moderately overweight, borderline hyperlipidemic individuals.


test
Slightly Negative


The CLA concentration in blood was significantly increased by CLA ingestion and reached 36 µmol/L. The CLA concentration in blood one week after the intake period was significantly lower than that at the end of CLA intake. The 10t12c-CLA level in plasma decreased faster than that of 9c11t-CLA. This suggests faster metabolism (fatty acid β oxidation) of 10t12c-CLA compared with 9c11t-CLA.


test
Slightly Negative


The supplementation of milk with 3 g CLA over 12 weeks results in a significant reduction of fat mass in overweight but not in obese subjects. CLA supplementation was not associated with any adverse effects or biological changes.


test
Slightly Negative


We conclude that CLA supplementation associated with aerobic exercise has no effect on body fat reduction and lipid profile improvements over placebo in young adult obese women.



What are Conjugated Linoleic Acid's effects on the body?

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for the Muscular System

In conclusion, although no detrimental effects were caused by supplementation, these results do not confirm a role for CLA in either body weight or blood lipid regulation in humans.


In conclusion, mixed-isomer CLA supplementation had a favourable effect on serum insulin and NEFA response to oral glucose in non-obese, regularly exercising women, but there were no CLA-specific effects on body composition, energy expenditure or appetite.


In conclusion, the regain of fat-free mass was favorably, dose-independently affected by a 13-week consumption of 1.8 or 3.6 g CLA/day and consequently increased the resting metabolic rate. However, it did not result in improved body weight maintenance after weight loss.


In conclusion, this study shows that CLA supplementation for 24 mo in healthy, overweight adults was well tolerated. It confirms also that CLA decreases BFM in overweight humans, and may help maintain initial reductions in BFM and weight in the long term.


In conclusion, whereas CLA may increase lean body mass in obese humans, it may also increase markers of inflammation in the short term.


In summary, supplementation with CLA plus n-3 LC-PUFA prevents increased abdominal fat mass and raises fat-free mass and adiponectin levels in younger obese individuals without deleteriously affecting insulin sensitivity, whereas these parameters in young and older lean and older obese individuals were unaffected, apart from increased fasting glucose in older obese men.


Long-term supplementation with CLA-FFA or CLA-triacylglycerol reduces BFM in healthy overweight adults.


Supplementation with CLA and SAF exerted different effects on BMI, total and trunk adipose mass, and lean tissue mass in obese postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. Supplementation with these dietary oils may be beneficial for weight loss, glycemic control, or both.


Supplementation with CLA during resistance training results in relatively small changes in body composition accompanied by a lessening of the catabolic effect of training on muscle protein.


The data suggest that conjugated linoleic acid may reduce BFM in humans and that no additional effect on BFM is achieved with doses > 3.4 g CLA/d.


The present results suggest that a 98 d supplementation diet with a 50 : 50 mixture of the two CLA isomers cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 in a dairy product was unable to alter body composition, although a significant increase in the RMR has been induced. Moreover, changes in mRNA PPAR gamma and HSL in adipose tissue were recorded.


The supplementation of CLA for 12 wk in overweight and grade I obese Chinese subjects yielded lower obesity indices, with no obvious adverse effects.


  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for the Overall Systems

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for the Digestive System

  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid for the Cardiovascular System

At biweekly visits, subjects completed a questionnaire evaluating side effects and adverse events. Blood was taken for assay of liver function, glucose, insulin, serum lipids, blood counts, and general chemistry. Overall, body composition did not differ between groups. Laboratory tests showed no adverse effects of CLA. Adverse events and side effects were less in the CLA group compared to placebo. We conclude that CLA as Clarinol is safe for use in obese humans for at least one year.


In conclusion, oil containing trans-10,cis-12 CLA has several adverse effects on classical and novel markers of coronary vascular disease, whereas the c9,t11 CLA isomer is more neutral, except for a small but significant increase in lipid peroxidation compared with olive oil.


In conclusion, when given as part of a diet rich in butter, a mixture of CLA isomers increased lipid peroxidation but did not affect risk markers of cardiovascular disease, inflammation, or fasting insulin and glucose concentrations.


It was shown that both CLA and exercise were effective in improvement of body composition and these effects were cumulated when they have been used together. CLA supplementation alone or with exercise seems effective on serum glucose and insulin concentrations but ineffective on endurance performance.


Results from this study fail to support the role of milk enriched naturally with CLA containing c-9, t-11 or synthetically with c-9, t-11 and t-10, c-12 CLA isomers in modulation of lipid profiles or body composition in moderately overweight, borderline hyperlipidemic individuals.


The CLA concentration in blood was significantly increased by CLA ingestion and reached 36 µmol/L. The CLA concentration in blood one week after the intake period was significantly lower than that at the end of CLA intake. The 10t12c-CLA level in plasma decreased faster than that of 9c11t-CLA. This suggests faster metabolism (fatty acid β oxidation) of 10t12c-CLA compared with 9c11t-CLA.


The supplementation of milk with 3 g CLA over 12 weeks results in a significant reduction of fat mass in overweight but not in obese subjects. CLA supplementation was not associated with any adverse effects or biological changes.


We conclude that CLA supplementation associated with aerobic exercise has no effect on body fat reduction and lipid profile improvements over placebo in young adult obese women.


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