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Lactobacillus reuteri

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What are Lactobacillus reuteri's other names?

  • ATCC 55730
  • ATCC PTA 6475
  • DSM 17938
  • NCIMB 30242

What is Lactobacillus reuteri's recommended dosage?

    No intake information available.

What supplements interact with Lactobacillus reuteri?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Lactobacillus reuteri help with?

  • Lactobacillus reuteri for Colic and crying

test
Slightly Positive


CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although L reuteri may be effective as treatment for crying in exclusively breastfed infants with colic, there is still insufficient evidence to support probiotic use to manage colic, especially in formula-fed infants, or to prevent infant crying. Results from larger rigorously designed studies applicable to all crying infants will help draw more definitive conclusions.


test
Slightly Positive


Exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants with infantile colic benefit from the administration of L reuteri DSM 17938 compared with placebo.


test
Slightly Positive


In our cohort, L. reuteri improved colicky symptoms in breastfed infants within 1 week of treatment, compared with simethicone, which suggests that probiotics may have a role in the treatment of infantile colic.


test
Slightly Positive


L reuteri DSM 17938 did not benefit a community sample of breastfed infants and formula fed infants with colic. These findings differ from previous smaller trials of selected populations and do not support a general recommendation for the use of probiotics to treat colic in infants.


test
Slightly Positive


L. reuteri DSM 17 938 at a dose of 10(8) colony-forming units per day in early breastfed infants improved symptoms of infantile colic and was well tolerated and safe. Gut microbiota changes induced by the probiotic could be involved in the observed clinical improvement.


test
Slightly Positive


L. reuteri DSM 17938 did not affect the global composition of the microbiota. However, the increase of Bacteroidetes in the responder infants indicated that a decrease in colicky symptoms was linked to changes of the microbiota.


test
Slightly Positive


Prophylactic use of L reuteri DSM 17938 during the first 3 months of life reduced the onset of functional gastrointestinal disorders and reduced private and public costs for the management of this condition.



What is Lactobacillus reuteri used for?

  • Lactobacillus reuteri for Digestion

test
Slightly Positive


CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although L reuteri may be effective as treatment for crying in exclusively breastfed infants with colic, there is still insufficient evidence to support probiotic use to manage colic, especially in formula-fed infants, or to prevent infant crying. Results from larger rigorously designed studies applicable to all crying infants will help draw more definitive conclusions.


test
Slightly Positive


Exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants with infantile colic benefit from the administration of L reuteri DSM 17938 compared with placebo.


test
Slightly Positive


In our cohort, L. reuteri improved colicky symptoms in breastfed infants within 1 week of treatment, compared with simethicone, which suggests that probiotics may have a role in the treatment of infantile colic.


test
Slightly Positive


L reuteri DSM 17938 did not benefit a community sample of breastfed infants and formula fed infants with colic. These findings differ from previous smaller trials of selected populations and do not support a general recommendation for the use of probiotics to treat colic in infants.


test
Slightly Positive


L. reuteri DSM 17 938 at a dose of 10(8) colony-forming units per day in early breastfed infants improved symptoms of infantile colic and was well tolerated and safe. Gut microbiota changes induced by the probiotic could be involved in the observed clinical improvement.


test
Slightly Positive


L. reuteri DSM 17938 did not affect the global composition of the microbiota. However, the increase of Bacteroidetes in the responder infants indicated that a decrease in colicky symptoms was linked to changes of the microbiota.


test
Slightly Positive


Prophylactic use of L reuteri DSM 17938 during the first 3 months of life reduced the onset of functional gastrointestinal disorders and reduced private and public costs for the management of this condition.



What are Lactobacillus reuteri's effects on the body?

  • Lactobacillus reuteri for the Digestive System

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although L reuteri may be effective as treatment for crying in exclusively breastfed infants with colic, there is still insufficient evidence to support probiotic use to manage colic, especially in formula-fed infants, or to prevent infant crying. Results from larger rigorously designed studies applicable to all crying infants will help draw more definitive conclusions.


Exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants with infantile colic benefit from the administration of L reuteri DSM 17938 compared with placebo.


In our cohort, L. reuteri improved colicky symptoms in breastfed infants within 1 week of treatment, compared with simethicone, which suggests that probiotics may have a role in the treatment of infantile colic.


L reuteri DSM 17938 did not benefit a community sample of breastfed infants and formula fed infants with colic. These findings differ from previous smaller trials of selected populations and do not support a general recommendation for the use of probiotics to treat colic in infants.


L. reuteri DSM 17 938 at a dose of 10(8) colony-forming units per day in early breastfed infants improved symptoms of infantile colic and was well tolerated and safe. Gut microbiota changes induced by the probiotic could be involved in the observed clinical improvement.


L. reuteri DSM 17938 did not affect the global composition of the microbiota. However, the increase of Bacteroidetes in the responder infants indicated that a decrease in colicky symptoms was linked to changes of the microbiota.


Prophylactic use of L reuteri DSM 17938 during the first 3 months of life reduced the onset of functional gastrointestinal disorders and reduced private and public costs for the management of this condition.


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