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Chromium

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What are Chromium's other names?

No other names for this supplement.

What is Chromium's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 1 mg
  • Recommended daily doses: 2

What supplements interact with Chromium?

No supplements that have a synergystic effect with this one.

What can Chromium help with?

  • Chromium for Acne

  • Chromium for Binge-eating

  • Chromium for Bipolar Disorder

  • Chromium for Depression

  • Chromium for Hirsutism


What is Chromium used for?

  • Chromium for Women's health

  • Chromium for Immunity

  • Chromium for Mental health

  • Chromium for Emotional health

  • Chromium for Heart health

  • Chromium for Weight loss

  • Chromium for Reproduction

  • Chromium for Insulin control

test
Slightly Positive


Acute chromium supplementation showed an effect on postprandial glucose metabolism in most but not all subjects. The response to Cr may be influenced by dietary patterns.


test
Slightly Positive


Biochemical parameters did not change in the placebo group except for LDL cholesterol which increased significantly. Body weight and medication profile remained stable throughout the study for both groups. In summary, chromium improved insulin resistance, metabolic abnormalities, and body composition in HIV+ patients. This suggests that chromium supplements alleviate some of the antiretroviral-associated metabolic abnormalities.


test
Slightly Positive


Calculated intakes of eight indicator nutrients were well above 100% of the RDA except for calcium. These healthy elderly persons, eating nutritious diets, are not at risk for Cr3+ deficiency as measured by the absence of a clinical response to CrCl3 or brewer's yeast supplementation. This study suggests that age per se is not a factor leading to Cr deficiency.


test
Slightly Positive


Chromium supplementation did not augment glycogen synthesis during recovery from high-intensity exercise and high-carbohydrate feeding, although there was a trend for lower PI 3-kinase activity.


test
Slightly Positive


Chromium supplementation does not appear to ameliorate insulin resistance or impaired glucose metabolism in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes and thus is unlikely to attenuate diabetes risk.


test
Slightly Positive


Chromium supplementation does not improve glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or lipid profile: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of supplementation in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: response to Gunton et al.


test
Slightly Positive


Chromium supplementation gives better control of glucose and lipid variables while decreasing drug dosage in type 2 diabetes patients. A larger scale study is needed to help decide on the convenient chemical form, and dosage required to achieve optimal response.


test
Slightly Positive


Clinical response to Cr is more likely in insulin-resistant subjects who have more elevated fasting glucose and A(1c) levels. Chromium may reduce myocellular lipids and enhance insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who do respond clinically independent of effects on weight or hepatic glucose production. Thus, modulation of lipid metabolism by Cr in peripheral tissues may represent a novel mechanism of action.


test
Slightly Positive


Collectively, these data suggest that RT decreases the insulin response following an oral glucose challenge in older moderately overweight men and women without affecting glucose tolerance. The data also suggest that the decrease in circulating insulin may result from an increase in insulin clearance, not a decrease in insulin secretion. High-dose Cr-pic supplementation had no effect on any measure of glucose metabolism during RT.


test
Slightly Positive


Cr lowers FBS but does not affect HbA1c, lipids and BMI.


test
Slightly Positive


CrPic at 1000 microg/day does not improve key features of the metabolic syndrome in obese nondiabetic patients.


test
Slightly Positive


CrPic supplementation had a beneficial effect on glycemic control in patients with poorly controlled T2DM, without affecting the lipid profile. Additional studies are necessary to investigate the effect of long-term CrPic supplementation.


test
Slightly Positive


These initial findings support further larger trials to determine chromium's efficacy in maintaining normal glucose regulation, reducing binge eating and related psychopathology, promoting modest weight loss, and reducing symptoms of depression in individuals with BED.


test
Slightly Positive


In addition, fMRI indicated comparatively increased activation for the CrPic subjects in right thalamic, right temporal, right posterior parietal, and bifrontal regions. These findings suggest that supplementation with CrPic can enhance cognitive inhibitory control and cerebral function in older adults at risk for neurodegeneration.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, chromium supplementation seems to improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetic patients, which appears to be due to an increase in insulin action rather than stimulation of insulin secretion.


test
Slightly Positive


In conclusion, Cr brewer's yeast has a weak hypoglycemic potential, but does not affect body mass, blood biochemical profile, and microelement levels in type 2 diabetic subjects.


test
Slightly Positive


Intake of milk powder containing 400 microg/d of chromium for 16 weeks in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus resulted in lowering of FPG, fasting insulin, and improvement of metabolic control in male patients.


test
Slightly Positive


Plasma TAS and glutathione peroxidase were significantly higher for Cr and Cr + C + E groups relative to the placebo group. These findings suggest that Cr supplementation alone and combined of Cr together with vitamins C and E was effective for minimization of oxidative stress and improvement of glucose metabolism in type 2 DM patients.


test
Slightly Positive


Plasma total cholesterol also decreased after 4 months in the subjects receiving 19.2 micromol/day Cr. These data demonstrate that supplemental chromium had significant beneficial effects on HbA1c, glucose, insulin, and cholesterol variables in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The beneficial effects of chromium in individuals with diabetes were observed at levels higher than the upper limit of the Estimated Safe and Adequate Daily Dietary Intake.


test
Slightly Positive


Short-term chromium supplementation shortens QTc interval in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.


test
Slightly Positive


Supplementation of 1000 microg of chromium picolinate alone, and in combination with nutritional education, did not affect weight loss in this population of overweight adults. Response to chromium did not vary with central adiposity.


test
Slightly Positive


The data confirm an ergogenic benefit of ingesting CHO during exercise designed to imitate sports like basketball, soccer, and hockey, but do not support the hypothesis that the addition of Cr would enhance this effect.


test
Slightly Positive


The titers were very stable within individuals and those of one individual rarely crossed over others, which was reflected in an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.00). There were no effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in this period. The results of this trial suggest that chromium (III) picolinate in a dose typically used for nutrient supplementation dose not increase oxidative DNA damage, as measured by anti-HMdU antibody levels.


test
Slightly Positive


There is no evidence that chromium in the form of chromium yeast is effective in improving glycemic control in Western patients with type 2 diabetes who are taking oral hypoglycemic agents.


test
Slightly Positive


These data demonstrate beneficial effect of chromium supplementation on glycaemic control and lipid variables in subjects with newly onset type-2 diabetes.


test
Slightly Positive


These data suggest CrPic has a role in food intake regulation, which may be mediated by a direct effect on the brain.


test
Slightly Positive


These data suggest that supplementation of well-controlled type 2 diabetics with Cr-enriched yeast is safe and can result in improvements in blood glucose variables and oxidative stress.


test
Slightly Positive


These results suggest that short-term chromium supplementation can improve insulin sensitivity and body composition in overweight children.


test
Slightly Positive


This study demonstrates that CrPic supplementation in subjects with type 2 diabetes who are taking sulfonylurea agents significantly improves insulin sensitivity and glucose control. Further, CrPic supplementation significantly attenuated body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation compared with the placebo group.


  • Chromium for Muscle building


What are Chromium's effects on the body?

  • Chromium for the Endocrine System

Acute chromium supplementation showed an effect on postprandial glucose metabolism in most but not all subjects. The response to Cr may be influenced by dietary patterns.


Biochemical parameters did not change in the placebo group except for LDL cholesterol which increased significantly. Body weight and medication profile remained stable throughout the study for both groups. In summary, chromium improved insulin resistance, metabolic abnormalities, and body composition in HIV+ patients. This suggests that chromium supplements alleviate some of the antiretroviral-associated metabolic abnormalities.


Calculated intakes of eight indicator nutrients were well above 100% of the RDA except for calcium. These healthy elderly persons, eating nutritious diets, are not at risk for Cr3+ deficiency as measured by the absence of a clinical response to CrCl3 or brewer's yeast supplementation. This study suggests that age per se is not a factor leading to Cr deficiency.


Chromium supplementation did not augment glycogen synthesis during recovery from high-intensity exercise and high-carbohydrate feeding, although there was a trend for lower PI 3-kinase activity.


Chromium supplementation does not appear to ameliorate insulin resistance or impaired glucose metabolism in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes and thus is unlikely to attenuate diabetes risk.


Chromium supplementation does not improve glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or lipid profile: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of supplementation in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: response to Gunton et al.


Chromium supplementation gives better control of glucose and lipid variables while decreasing drug dosage in type 2 diabetes patients. A larger scale study is needed to help decide on the convenient chemical form, and dosage required to achieve optimal response.


Clinical response to Cr is more likely in insulin-resistant subjects who have more elevated fasting glucose and A(1c) levels. Chromium may reduce myocellular lipids and enhance insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who do respond clinically independent of effects on weight or hepatic glucose production. Thus, modulation of lipid metabolism by Cr in peripheral tissues may represent a novel mechanism of action.


Collectively, these data suggest that RT decreases the insulin response following an oral glucose challenge in older moderately overweight men and women without affecting glucose tolerance. The data also suggest that the decrease in circulating insulin may result from an increase in insulin clearance, not a decrease in insulin secretion. High-dose Cr-pic supplementation had no effect on any measure of glucose metabolism during RT.


Cr lowers FBS but does not affect HbA1c, lipids and BMI.


CrPic at 1000 microg/day does not improve key features of the metabolic syndrome in obese nondiabetic patients.


CrPic supplementation had a beneficial effect on glycemic control in patients with poorly controlled T2DM, without affecting the lipid profile. Additional studies are necessary to investigate the effect of long-term CrPic supplementation.


These initial findings support further larger trials to determine chromium's efficacy in maintaining normal glucose regulation, reducing binge eating and related psychopathology, promoting modest weight loss, and reducing symptoms of depression in individuals with BED.


In addition, fMRI indicated comparatively increased activation for the CrPic subjects in right thalamic, right temporal, right posterior parietal, and bifrontal regions. These findings suggest that supplementation with CrPic can enhance cognitive inhibitory control and cerebral function in older adults at risk for neurodegeneration.


In conclusion, chromium supplementation seems to improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetic patients, which appears to be due to an increase in insulin action rather than stimulation of insulin secretion.


In conclusion, Cr brewer's yeast has a weak hypoglycemic potential, but does not affect body mass, blood biochemical profile, and microelement levels in type 2 diabetic subjects.


Intake of milk powder containing 400 microg/d of chromium for 16 weeks in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus resulted in lowering of FPG, fasting insulin, and improvement of metabolic control in male patients.


Overall, taking chromium for 8 weeks among women with PCOS had beneficial effects on acne, hirsutism, hs-CRP, TAC, and MDA levels, but it did not affect endocrine profiles, NO, and GSH.


Plasma TAS and glutathione peroxidase were significantly higher for Cr and Cr + C + E groups relative to the placebo group. These findings suggest that Cr supplementation alone and combined of Cr together with vitamins C and E was effective for minimization of oxidative stress and improvement of glucose metabolism in type 2 DM patients.


Plasma total cholesterol also decreased after 4 months in the subjects receiving 19.2 micromol/day Cr. These data demonstrate that supplemental chromium had significant beneficial effects on HbA1c, glucose, insulin, and cholesterol variables in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The beneficial effects of chromium in individuals with diabetes were observed at levels higher than the upper limit of the Estimated Safe and Adequate Daily Dietary Intake.


Short-term chromium supplementation shortens QTc interval in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.


Supplementation of 1000 microg of chromium picolinate alone, and in combination with nutritional education, did not affect weight loss in this population of overweight adults. Response to chromium did not vary with central adiposity.


The data confirm an ergogenic benefit of ingesting CHO during exercise designed to imitate sports like basketball, soccer, and hockey, but do not support the hypothesis that the addition of Cr would enhance this effect.


The titers were very stable within individuals and those of one individual rarely crossed over others, which was reflected in an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.00). There were no effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in this period. The results of this trial suggest that chromium (III) picolinate in a dose typically used for nutrient supplementation dose not increase oxidative DNA damage, as measured by anti-HMdU antibody levels.


There is no evidence that chromium in the form of chromium yeast is effective in improving glycemic control in Western patients with type 2 diabetes who are taking oral hypoglycemic agents.


These data demonstrate beneficial effect of chromium supplementation on glycaemic control and lipid variables in subjects with newly onset type-2 diabetes.


These data suggest CrPic has a role in food intake regulation, which may be mediated by a direct effect on the brain.


These data suggest that supplementation of well-controlled type 2 diabetics with Cr-enriched yeast is safe and can result in improvements in blood glucose variables and oxidative stress.


These results suggest that short-term chromium supplementation can improve insulin sensitivity and body composition in overweight children.


This study demonstrates that CrPic supplementation in subjects with type 2 diabetes who are taking sulfonylurea agents significantly improves insulin sensitivity and glucose control. Further, CrPic supplementation significantly attenuated body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation compared with the placebo group.


  • Chromium for the Digestive System

  • Chromium for the Nervous System

  • Chromium for the Immune System

  • Chromium for the Reproductive System

  • Chromium for the Cardiovascular System

  • Chromium for the Integumentary system

  • Chromium for the Muscular System

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