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Ginger

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What are Ginger's other names?

  • Zingiber officinale Roscoe
  • Zingiberaceae

What is Ginger's recommended dosage?

  • Recommended daily intake: 1 - 3 g

What supplements interact with Ginger?

  • Ginger and Magnolia Bark Extract


What can Ginger help with?

  • Ginger for Nausea and Vomiting

test
Moderately Positive


For women looking for relief from their nausea, dry retching, and vomiting, the use of ginger in early pregnancy will reduce their symptoms to an equivalent extent as vitamin B6.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger can be considered as a useful treatment option for women suffering from morning sickness.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger has efficacy in prevention of nausea and vomiting after major gynecologic surgery.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger has shown efficacy for prevention of nausea and borderline significance to prevention vomiting after gynecological laparoscopy at 6 hour post operation.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger is effective for relieving the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger may be an effective treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. However, more observational studies, with a larger sample size, are needed to confirm the encouraging preliminary data on ginger safety.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger root powder was effective in reducing severity of acute and delayed CINV as additional therapy to ondensetron and dexamethasone in patients receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00940368).


test
Moderately Positive


No side effects were observed. The possible mutagenic and antimutagenic characters of ginger reported in a study of E. coli have not been evaluated with respect to any significance in humans. Powdered root of ginger in daily doses of 1 g during 4 days was better than placebo in diminishing or eliminating the symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum.


test
Moderately Positive


The ingestion of 1 g of ginger in syrup in a divided dose daily may be useful in some patients experiencing nausea and vomiting in the first trimester of pregnancy.


test
Moderately Positive


The pooled absolute risk reduction for the incidence of postoperative nausea, however, indicated a non-significant difference between the ginger and placebo groups for ginger 1 g taken before operation (absolute risk reduction 0.052 (95% confidence interval -0.082 to 0.186)). One study was found for each of the following conditions: seasickness, morning sickness and chemotherapy-induced nausea. These studies collectively favoured ginger over placebo.


test
Moderately Positive


This meta-analysis demonstrates that a fixed dose at least 1 g of ginger is more effective than placebo for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting and postoperative vomiting. Use of ginger is an effective means for reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting.


  • Ginger for Colorectal Cancer

  • Ginger for Dizziness and Vertigo

  • Ginger for Inflammation

  • Ginger for Muscle Soreness

  • Ginger for Osteoarthritis

  • Ginger for Period Pain

  • Ginger for GERD


What is Ginger used for?

  • Ginger for Digestion

test
Moderately Positive


For women looking for relief from their nausea, dry retching, and vomiting, the use of ginger in early pregnancy will reduce their symptoms to an equivalent extent as vitamin B6.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger can be considered as a useful treatment option for women suffering from morning sickness.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger has efficacy in prevention of nausea and vomiting after major gynecologic surgery.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger has shown efficacy for prevention of nausea and borderline significance to prevention vomiting after gynecological laparoscopy at 6 hour post operation.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger is effective for relieving the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger may be an effective treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. However, more observational studies, with a larger sample size, are needed to confirm the encouraging preliminary data on ginger safety.


test
Moderately Positive


Ginger root powder was effective in reducing severity of acute and delayed CINV as additional therapy to ondensetron and dexamethasone in patients receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00940368).


test
Moderately Positive


No side effects were observed. The possible mutagenic and antimutagenic characters of ginger reported in a study of E. coli have not been evaluated with respect to any significance in humans. Powdered root of ginger in daily doses of 1 g during 4 days was better than placebo in diminishing or eliminating the symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum.


test
Moderately Positive


The ingestion of 1 g of ginger in syrup in a divided dose daily may be useful in some patients experiencing nausea and vomiting in the first trimester of pregnancy.


test
Moderately Positive


The pooled absolute risk reduction for the incidence of postoperative nausea, however, indicated a non-significant difference between the ginger and placebo groups for ginger 1 g taken before operation (absolute risk reduction 0.052 (95% confidence interval -0.082 to 0.186)). One study was found for each of the following conditions: seasickness, morning sickness and chemotherapy-induced nausea. These studies collectively favoured ginger over placebo.


test
Moderately Positive


This meta-analysis demonstrates that a fixed dose at least 1 g of ginger is more effective than placebo for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting and postoperative vomiting. Use of ginger is an effective means for reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting.


test
Slightly Positive


There was no difference between the groups in terms of total adverse events P = 0.55). On the basis of these results, it seems that ginger has the potential to decrease eicosanoid levels, perhaps by inhibiting their synthesis from arachidonic acid. Ginger also seemed to be tolerable and safe. Further investigation in people at high risk for CRC seems warranted.


test
Slightly Negative


Ginger did not affect LES pressure at rest or esophageal contractile amplitude and duration when swallowing, but caused more relaxation of the LES and decreased the esophageal contraction velocity, which may cause more chance of gastric gas expel or antiflatulant effect.


  • Ginger for Women's health

  • Ginger for Overall health

  • Ginger for Joint support

  • Ginger for Muscle building

  • Ginger for Weight loss

  • Ginger for Mental health

  • Ginger for Antioxidant potential

  • Ginger for Heart health


What are Ginger's effects on the body?

  • Ginger for the Digestive System

For women looking for relief from their nausea, dry retching, and vomiting, the use of ginger in early pregnancy will reduce their symptoms to an equivalent extent as vitamin B6.


Ginger can be considered as a useful treatment option for women suffering from morning sickness.


Ginger has efficacy in prevention of nausea and vomiting after major gynecologic surgery.


Ginger has shown efficacy for prevention of nausea and borderline significance to prevention vomiting after gynecological laparoscopy at 6 hour post operation.


Ginger is effective for relieving the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.


Ginger may be an effective treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. However, more observational studies, with a larger sample size, are needed to confirm the encouraging preliminary data on ginger safety.


Ginger root powder was effective in reducing severity of acute and delayed CINV as additional therapy to ondensetron and dexamethasone in patients receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00940368).


No side effects were observed. The possible mutagenic and antimutagenic characters of ginger reported in a study of E. coli have not been evaluated with respect to any significance in humans. Powdered root of ginger in daily doses of 1 g during 4 days was better than placebo in diminishing or eliminating the symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum.


The ingestion of 1 g of ginger in syrup in a divided dose daily may be useful in some patients experiencing nausea and vomiting in the first trimester of pregnancy.


The pooled absolute risk reduction for the incidence of postoperative nausea, however, indicated a non-significant difference between the ginger and placebo groups for ginger 1 g taken before operation (absolute risk reduction 0.052 (95% confidence interval -0.082 to 0.186)). One study was found for each of the following conditions: seasickness, morning sickness and chemotherapy-induced nausea. These studies collectively favoured ginger over placebo.


This meta-analysis demonstrates that a fixed dose at least 1 g of ginger is more effective than placebo for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting and postoperative vomiting. Use of ginger is an effective means for reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting.


The results, showing enhanced thermogenesis and reduced feelings of hunger with ginger consumption, suggest a potential role of ginger in weight management. Additional studies are necessary to confirm these findings.


There was no difference between the groups in terms of total adverse events P = 0.55). On the basis of these results, it seems that ginger has the potential to decrease eicosanoid levels, perhaps by inhibiting their synthesis from arachidonic acid. Ginger also seemed to be tolerable and safe. Further investigation in people at high risk for CRC seems warranted.


Ginger accelerates gastric emptying and stimulates antral contractions in healthy volunteers. These effects could potentially be beneficial in symptomatic patient groups.


Ginger did not affect LES pressure at rest or esophageal contractile amplitude and duration when swallowing, but caused more relaxation of the LES and decreased the esophageal contraction velocity, which may cause more chance of gastric gas expel or antiflatulant effect.


Ginger stimulated gastric emptying and antral contractions in patients with functional dyspepsia, but had no impact on gastrointestinal symptoms or gut peptides.


The frequency of the electrogastrogram (EGG) was increased after M-III (tachygastria) and the normal increase in EGG amplitude after liquid ingestion was reduced in motion sick subjects. Although powdered ginger (500 mg) partially inhibited tachygastria in motion sickness, it did not enhance the EGG amplitude in motion sick subjects. We conclude that ginger does not possess antimotion sickness activity, nor does it significantly alter gastric function during motion sickness.


This study showed that gastric feed supplementation with ginger extract might reduce delayed gastric emptying and help reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in ARDS.


  • Ginger for the Immune System

  • Ginger for the Skeletal System

  • Ginger for the Reproductive System

  • Ginger for the Cardiovascular System

  • Ginger for the Nervous System

  • Ginger for the Muscular System

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